come to pass, to

come to pass

To happen. The phrase often indicates that what is happening is the result of a course of events. Our only hope now is that these dire predictions will not come to pass, but can be avoided somehow. When it finally came to pass, it almost felt like a letdown.
See also: come, pass

come to pass

to happen; to take place. And when do you think all these good things will come to pass? Do you think it will really come to pass?
See also: come, pass

come to pass

To occur.
See also: come, pass

come to pass, to

To happen. Probably the most famous occurrence of this phrase is at the beginning of the Christmas story as related in the Gospel of St. Luke (2:1): “And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus.” Eric Partridge said it was already a cliché by about 1700, but this archaic turn of phrase has survived nevertheless.
See also: come