come out of one's shell, to

come out of one's shell

To be or become less shy or reticent and more sociable, outgoing, or enthusiastic. Samantha was quite a quiet girl growing up, but she really started coming out of her shell in college. Jack is actually a very funny, engaging guy when he comes out of his shell.
See also: come, of, out, shell

come out of one's shell

Fig. to become more friendly; to be more sociable. (Alludes to a shy turtle putting its head out of its shell.) Come out of your shell, Tom. Go out and make some friends.
See also: come, of, out, shell

come out of one's shell, to

To overcome one’s shyness or inhibitions. Ebenezer Brewer believed this saying alludes to the tortoise, which hides from danger by retreating under its shell. It might equally well allude to a newly hatched bird. “The shell must break before the bird can fly,” wrote Tennyson (The Ancient Sage, 1885).
See also: come, of, out