colored

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Related to coloreds: Frederik Willem de Klerk
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color in

To fill something with color, as of the outlines of pictures in coloring books. A noun or pronoun can be used between "color" and "in." My daughter loves art, so just give her crayons and a coloring book, and she'll color in the pictures all day long. I love drawing with pencil and ink, but I don't think it ever looks as good if I color it in.
See also: color

color up

1. To cover someone or something with color. A noun or pronoun can be used between "color" and "up." Tens of thousands of people get colored up with brightly colored powders called Gulal. I wanted to color my outfit up with some nice accessories.
2. To fill in a black-and-white image with color. A noun or pronoun can be used between "color" and "up." I do all the drawings in ink, and a friend of mine colors them up for me.
3. To become red in the face, as from embarrassment; to blush. I could feel myself coloring up as I awkwardly asked Cindy on a date.
4. To exchange lower-denomination casino chips for fewer chips of a higher denomination. A noun or pronoun can be used between "color" and "up." I raked in my winnings and then made my way over to the cashier to color up my chips.
See also: color, up

look (at something) through rose-colored glasses

To assume a generally optimistic and cheerful attitude (toward something); to focus on the positive aspects (of something). Primarily heard in US. I know nostalgia can be misleading, but I really look at my childhood through rose-colored glasses. It seems like Mary only looks through rose-colored glasses, like she's in incapable of dealing with the negative things in life!
See also: glass, look, through

look (at something) through rose-coloured spectacles

To assume a generally optimistic and cheerful attitude (toward something); to focus only or mostly on the positive aspects (of something). Primarily heard in UK. I know nostalgia can be misleading, but I really look at my childhood through rose-coloured spectacles. It seems like Mary only looks through rose-coloured spectacles, like she's in incapable of dealing with the negative things in life!
See also: look, spectacle, through

rose-colored

Of a shade of pink. I'm going to wear a rose-colored dress to the wedding this weekend. We love watching the rose-colored clouds at sunset.

rose-colored glasses

An unduly idealistic, optimistic, sentimental, or wistful perspective on or about something. Primarily heard in US. I know Sarah looks on our childhood with rose-colored glasses, but I can't put aside how difficult my parents' failing marriage was for all of us. Despite doing worse every quarter for the last two years, our boss keeps seeing the business through rose-colored glasses. You need to take off your rose-colored glasses for a moment and realize that there are serious problems in the world that need fixing.
See also: glass

rose-coloured spectacles

An unduly idealistic, optimistic, sentimental, or wistful perspective on or about something. Primarily heard in UK. I know Sarah looks on our childhood with rose-coloured spectacles, but I can't put aside how difficult my parents' failing marriage was for all of us. Despite doing worse every quarter for the last two years, our boss keeps seeing the business through rose-coloured spectacles. You need to take off your rose-coloured spectacles for a moment and realise that there are serious problems in the world that need fixing.
See also: spectacle

see (something) through rose-colored glasses

To assume a generally optimistic and cheerful attitude toward something; to focus only or mostly on the positive aspects of something. Nostalgia can be misleading—we all tend to see our childhoods through rose-colored glasses. I think Mary is only capable of seeing things through rose-colored glasses, like she's in complete denial of the negative things in life!
See also: glass, see, through

see (something) through rose-coloured spectacles

To assume a generally optimistic and cheerful attitude toward something; to focus only or mostly on the positive aspects of something. Primarily heard in UK. Nostalgia can be misleading—we all tend to see our childhoods through rose-coloured spectacles. I think Mary is only capable of seeing things through rose-coloured spectacles, like she's in complete denial of the negative things in life!
See also: see, spectacle, through

through rose-colored glasses

With a generally optimistic and cheerful attitude. I know nostalgia can be misleading, but I really look at my childhood through rose-colored glasses. I think Mary is only capable of looking through rose-colored glasses, like she's in complete denial of the negative things in life.
See also: glass, through

wear rose-colored glasses

To assume an unduly optimistic and cheerful attitude (toward something); to focus solely or primarily on the positive aspects (of something). Primarily heard in US. Many of us wear rose-colored glasses when we think back to our childhoods. It's part of the reason nostalgia is such a powerful emotional draw. I find it a little irksome how you always wear rose-colored glasses, even in the worst of times!
See also: glass, wear
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

color something in

to paint or draw color on a pattern or outline. Here is a sketch. Please color it in. Color in the sketch, please.
See also: color
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

see through rose-colored glasses

Also, look through rose-colored glasses. Take an optimistic view of something, as in Kate enjoys just about every activity; she sees the world through rose-colored glasses, or If only Marvin wouldn't be so critical, if he could look through rose-colored glasses once in a while, he'd be much happier . The adjectives rosy and rose-colored have been used in the sense of "hopeful" or "optimistic" since the 1700s; the current idiom dates from the 1850s.
See also: glass, see, through
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

color in

v.
To cover completely the bounded surface of something with a color: The child colored in an outline of a tree with green crayon. We traced the stencil and colored it in.
See also: color
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

through rose-colored glasses

With an unduly cheerful, optimistic, or favorable view of things: see the world through rose-colored glasses.
See also: glass, through
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rose-colored glasses, to look/see through

To view events and people very positively, seeing only their good points; unmitigated optimism. This term began to be used figuratively by the 1850s. “I was young . . . and I saw everything through rose-coloured spectacles,” wrote Princess Pauline Metternich (Days That Are No More, 1921). A twentieth-century synonym is to see the glass half full, to see the favorable aspect of circumstances, to look on the bright side. The antonym, to see the glass half empty, is also current. “This . . . group . . . looks at a reservoir that is half full and doomfully declares that it’s half empty” (New York Times, 1981).
See also: look, see, through
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Now, I know you don't know much about Alabama, but peckerwoods in Alabama would kill a colored man for waking up on Sunday.
Now, I don't believe they had real schools for colored then, and I only went because my mama was the sweetest woman on this earth and I would do anything my mama asked.
Virie used to be a pinup-girl for the colored boys during the war, but she was never what you would call a patriot.
There's not a white man alive don't think he can take care of business better than a colored man.
Although The Colored Museum established a formidable starting point, the exorcism of racist black stereotypes was a task too enormous to be accomplished with one work.
Elam, Jr., applied Gates's theory to African American theatre, more specifically to The Colored Museum.
The Colored Museum is, of course, set in a museum and leads us on a tour of exhibits, whereas Michael Henry Brown's King of Coons, though cinematic in scope, is placed in Hollywood.
I Ain't Yo' Uncle--The New Jack Revisionist Uncle Tom's Cabin premiered in 1990 and functions as a kind of bookend to The Colored Museum by harkening back to a significant source of many stereotypical characterizations of African Americans--the characters made famous in Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin.