Colonel Blimp

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Colonel Blimp

An older man who is pompous or irritable and adheres to an outdated ideology. The name comes from a British comic strip character that first appeared in the London Evening Standard newspaper in 1934. Primarily heard in UK. He's such a Colonel Blimp when he starts ranting about his views on welfare and the poor.
See also: blimp
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
About two years before the time of which I am now writing, and about a year and a half before the time of his death, the Colonel came unexpectedly to my lady's house in London.
"Tell Colonel Herncastle," she said, when I gave her her brother's message, "that Miss Verinder is engaged, and that I decline to see him." I tried to plead for a civiller answer than that; knowing the Colonel's constitutional superiority to the restraints which govern gentlemen in general.
"Do not pursue her," said Monsieur Fanjat to the colonel, "or you will arouse an aversion which might become insurmountable.
To own the truth, Colonel Silky was delighted with me.
"Poor devil!" said the colonel, coughing tremendously.
Be that as it might, it seemed to produce no awakening effect on Colonel Pyncheon.
The colonel deliberately stopped the regiment and turned to Nesvitski.
He rejoiced that he had not betrayed his knowledge of the Colonel's house; and when, on his return to barracks, he discovered that no cheroot-case had been left behind, he beamed with delight.
He asked all travellers whether they knew a certain Colonel Lor Crawley--avec sa femme une petite dame, tres spirituelle.
'Well, well,' ses th' colonel, 'they deserve t' be major generals,' he ses.
"He has been in your service some years, Colonel Ross?"
By this time I could understand a few words of their strange language, and when the colonel asked me if I would prefer to remain at the post as his body servant, I signified my willingness as emphatically as possible, for I had seen enough of the brutality of the common soldiers toward their white slaves to have no desire to start out upon a march of unknown length, chained by the neck, and driven on by the great whips that a score of the soldiers carried to accelerate the speed of their charges.
Should he perceive Colonel Proctor, we could not prevent a collision which might have terrible results.
The colonel, Demin, had taken a large country house.
He had been a colonel in the Confederate army, and still maintained, with the title, the military bearing which had always accompanied it.