cold-shoulder


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cold shoulder

1. noun A display or appearance of disinterest; a snub. This phrase usually refers to the act of ignoring someone. It originated with the 19th-century practice of serving of a cold shoulder of meat to tiresome guests. She thinks you started that rumor about her—that's why she's been giving you the cold shoulder all day.
2. adjective Describing a type of women's shirt that has sleeves but leaves the shoulders exposed. In this usage, the phrase is typically hyphenated. I think I'm too old to be wearing a cold shoulder top like that!
See also: cold, shoulder

cold-shoulder

to ignore someone; to give someone a cool reception. (See also the cold shoulder.) The hostess cold-shouldered me, so I spilt my appetizers in the swimming pool. Tiffany cold-shouldered the guy who was trying to flirt with her.
References in periodicals archive ?
He was cold-shouldered by the TV industry for his politically-incorrect humour
The trainee solicitor had frolicked under the sheets with the dental nurse - then cold-shouldered her in his last days in the house.
Despite abundant evidence to the contrary, she cold-shoulders any suggestion that popular and legal attitudes toward opiates, cocaine, marijuana, and such have been shaped not just by psychopharmacological factors, but also cultural and racial ones.
Is Sir Alex losing his grip when he allows the French keeper to cavort at a Champs Elysees nightclub 36 hours before a major match, yet Becks is cold-shouldered for living it up with Posh Spice?
SPICE GIRL Mel B's new album, Hot, has been cold-shouldered in favour of Sir Cliff Richard.
An eyewitness claimed Ferguson angrily cold-shouldered a friendly approach from Gray before the teams emerged.
She's cold-shouldered the offer because it's too much like hard work.