coin a phrase

coin a phrase

To create a new expression. Don't try to coin a phrase, just write a straightforward headline.
See also: coin, phrase

coin a phrase

Fig. to create a new expression that is worthy of being remembered and repeated. (Often jocular.) He is "worth his weight in feathers," to coin a phrase.
See also: coin, phrase

coin a phrase, to

To fashion an expression. This term, dating from the 1940s, is often used ironically to apologize for using a cliché, as in “He acts like the cock of the walk, to coin a phrase.” Of course it can also be used straightforwardly and refer to inventing an expression, a usage dating from the late 1500s.
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References in periodicals archive ?
To coin a phrase used by a popular satirical journal: "We should be told"
Money makes the art world go round (to coin a phrase), and a semi-ironic clinking-clanking will surely issue from the Salzburger Kunstverein's galleries this summer.
And she raised a laugh when she pinched her husband's famous slogan, saying: "To coin a phrase we need education, education, education.
Looking at these figures, you wonder not why there has been so much political "malaise" (to coin a phrase) since 1973, but why there hasn't been a revolution.