cohabit with (someone or something)

(redirected from cohabiting with)

cohabit with (someone or something)

1. Literally, to live with someone or something. This usage is often applied to different species of animals that are living together. It took some time, but our cat and dog are now able to cohabit with each other peacefully.
2. To live with a romantic partner whom one is not married to. My daughter is already cohabiting with her new boyfriend, and I am not thrilled about it.
3. euphemism To have sexual intercourse with one. I heard a rumor that you've been cohabiting with Steve—is it true?
See also: cohabit

cohabit with someone

 
1. [for an unmarried person] to live with a person of the opposite sex. They were cohabiting with one another for several years.
2. Euph. to copulate with someone. She had been cohabiting with him, and she admitted it in court.
See also: cohabit
References in classic literature ?
At the same time, it being an unlawful, incestuous living, added to that aversion, and though I had no great concern about it in point of conscience, yet everything added to make cohabiting with him the most nauseous thing to me in the world; and I think verily it was come to such a height, that I could almost as willingly have embraced a dog as have let him offer anything of that kind to me, for which reason I could not bear the thoughts of coming between the sheets with him.
Thus, fathers who are married to or cohabiting with mothers may be more involved than fathers who are not in coresidential relationships with mothers.
AN estimated one in six people are now cohabiting with their partner as the number of married couples in England and Wales continues to decline, according to figures.
London, Feb 15 (ANI): A majority of couples in the UK - whether married or cohabiting with their partners - are happy in their relationship.
Trimberger reports on the different types of social configurations in which some women participate, including "women cohabiting with nonromantic significant others.
Often alone, seldom sharing space with other circles or curvilinear elements, and sometimes cohabiting with rectilinear and triangular shapes, each hand-painted but compass-accurate circle is in some way incomplete.
It is also one of the few empirical studies comparing cohabiting with married couples in two different age cohorts.
It focuses on four types of living arrangements for children: living with a married mother; coresiding with a single mother and her parents; cohabiting with a single mother and her male partner; and living with a single mother who is neither coresiding nor cohabiting.