coexist

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Related to coexisted: To dispose of, took over

coexist with (someone or something)

To occupy the same space as someone or something, often peacefully. Can you please stop fighting and just coexist with your sister for a few hours? It took some time, but our cat and dog are now able to coexist with each other.
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coexist with someone or something

to exist agreeably or tolerably with or at the same time as someone or something. I decided that I would have to coexist with your policies, despite my objections. It is hard for cats to coexist with dogs.
See also: coexist
References in periodicals archive ?
"The muses must be represented in attitudes of waiting," wrote Jean Cocteau, whose compulsion to continue producing even in the absence of inspiration perhaps helps explain how the artistry of his writing and films coexisted with the repetitive, facile elegance of much of his work on paper.
They lived during a phase of the Neolithic period, or New Stone Age, when hunter-gatherer and agricultural groups coexisted in the Middle East.
erectus coexisted in a dry grassland environment, Suwa and his coworkers assert.
sapiens lineages could have coexisted in several regions, she notes.
A younger date would suggest that knowledge about producing these points coexisted in Siberia and North America or moved back and forth from one continent to the other, they hold.
Depression often coexisted with alcoholism, but alcoholism usually began first, according to Vaillant.
In the debate over whether Neandertals coexisted with anatomically modern humans in the Middle East, some partisans claim that their critics need to wake up and smell the evidence.
But pollen studies indicate the modern boreal forest represents a relatively new community that developed only 8,000 years ago although similar mixes of trees may have coexisted during previous interglacial periods.
Furthermore, the researchers argue, Maya on the geographic fringes of Spanish conquest forged a faith and a way of life in which two disparate religions coexisted. Small churches, served by circuit-riding Spanish priests and local Maya trained in Catholic practices, were established at Tipu and Lamanai, but lapses into preconquest religious customs occurred frequently, Graham and her co-workers note.
Other researchers have uncovered evidence that humans and the extinct mammals coexisted in Tasmania 20,000 years ago, with the latter group disappearing 11,000 years ago.
The researchers think that Bocatherium was a rodent-like herbivore that coexisted with early carnivorous mammals for 50 million years before becoming extinct in the late Jurassic some 150 million years ago.