code-switch

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code-switch

1. To alternate between two or more languages while speaking. My mom grew up in Quebec, and though she speaks English fluently now, she still sometimes code-switches back to French mid-sentence.
2. To change one's language or manner of speaking or communication to match one's current environment or audience. Many African Americans spend their whole life code-switching. Sorry for the tween slang—I tend to code-switch when I'm around my kids.

code-switching

1. The act or practice of alternating between two or more languages while speaking. My mom grew up in Quebec, and though she speaks English fluently now, she's prone to code-switching back to French mid-sentence.
2. The act or practice of changing one's language or manner of speaking or communication to match one's current environment or audience. Code-switching is an inherent part of African-American culture. Code-switching is a big part of communicating with my kids—I try to use the terms they know.
References in periodicals archive ?
The former book seems to follow up on an earlier monograph which was also edited by one of its coeditors, Herbert Schendl and Wright's Code-Switching in Early English (2011), which discusses many of the terminological contentions and empirical observations that are at the centre of the aforementioned volume under review: the widely debated boundaries between one-word code-switches and lexical borrowings--see the contributions in Pahta et al.
(4) Diachronic variation is particularly noticeable in Tuominen's chapter, which reveals a progressive decline in the number of code-switches to Latin from the first to the second half of the seventeenth century.
Anne is a student at an English-language CEGEP and she code-switches to avoid confrontation, like the vast majority of Quebec English-speaking participants.
Like his Quebec English-speaking counterparts, Raoul, an undergraduate student at a French-language university, code-switches to pass as an English speaker because of his fluency in English, depending on the circumstances.
Furthermore, the fact that the code-switches are artificial serves to dismantle the idea of "Spanglish" as an innovative or hybrid sort of language.
Shana Poplack demonstrates that code-switching -both inter- and extra-sentential -is subject to an "equivalence constraint," i.e., code-switches tend to occur at points in discourse where the juxtaposition of the two languages does not violate a syntactic rule of either language (1980).
There are instances of multiple code-switches or borrowing from German to Slovak to English in her speech.
Apart from formulaic frames or ritualized fragments (e.g., prayers in medical discourse), Latin provided specialized terminology, often starting off as code-switches and later incorporated into native vocabulary as borrowings (on the fuzzy boundary between the two phenomena, see, e.g., Myers-Scotton 1992, Bullock & Toribio 2009: 5, Gardner-Chloros 2009).
The present case study focuses in-depth on the written code-switches of a Spanish-English bilingual.
This paper seeks to demonstrate which models that account for the incidence of code-switching have explanatory power in relation to a large number of code-switches. Based on a large sample, this paper seeks to provide an answer to the question: which of the following features--psycholinguistic, metalinguistic and socio-psychological --are most frequently located in speech containing code-switching?
Thus, quotations only make up 1.9 percent of the code-switches in the corpus, the least productive category of all.
Whenever there is more than one language spoken in a community, its population code-switches for effective and impressive communication.
It seems as if the teacher code-switches when he/she wishes to be friendly with the students.
Throughout his poetry, Scofield provides glossaries of English translations for the Cree words he code-switches. While this is helpful for literal translations, Jennifer Andrews confirms the notions of cultural dialectics and dialogics that can be found through code-switching.
(8) That is, as Toribio (2001) has pointed out, bilinguals distinguish between permissible and unacceptable code-switches and would agree that the example in (14) is possible while that in (15) is not.