code-switch

(redirected from code switches)

code-switch

1. To alternate between two or more languages while speaking. My mom grew up in Quebec, and though she speaks English fluently now, she still sometimes code-switches back to French mid-sentence.
2. To change one's language or manner of speaking or communication to match one's current environment or audience. Many African Americans spend their whole life code-switching. Sorry for the tween slang—I tend to code-switch when I'm around my kids.

code-switching

1. The act or practice of alternating between two or more languages while speaking. My mom grew up in Quebec, and though she speaks English fluently now, she's prone to code-switching back to French mid-sentence.
2. The act or practice of changing one's language or manner of speaking or communication to match one's current environment or audience. Code-switching is an inherent part of African-American culture. Code-switching is a big part of communicating with my kids—I try to use the terms they know.
References in periodicals archive ?
The narrative voice seeks to create (superficial, artificial) "code switches"--which do not correspond to the spoken reality of bilingual speakers either in New York or in Puerto Rico--to ridicule and symbolize Suzie's superficiality and artificial "Americanness." Much more complex crossings result, perhaps to imply a multifaceted (non-hyphenated) subjectivity in Suzie under an apparent and imposed binary discourse or assumed "Spanglish." One may argue that the language crossing of the text reinforces the negative stereotypes that contribute to the doubt and denial regarding a variety of Spanish particular to the U.S., i.e., something called "U.S.
(9) According to the Equivalence Constraint code switches are allowed as long as the word order requirements of both languages are met.
The researchers then experimented with language switches called code switches that are regularly heard by children in bilingual communities like "That one looks fun!
Code switches will tend to occur at points in discourse where juxtapositions of L1 and L2 elements does not violate a syntactic rule of either language (i.e., points around which the surface structures of the two language map onto each other).
H further shows that borrowings have a lower type-token ratio than code switches, that is, borrowings occur with higher frequency in the data (p.