cockle

(redirected from cockles)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

cockles of (one's) heart

The deepest part of oneself. Often used in the phrase "warmed the cockles of (one's) heart." Thank you so much—your kind words really warmed the cockles of my heart.
See also: cockle, heart, of

sit (up)on hot cockles

To be impatient. Quit sitting on hot cockles—you'll get your birthday present soon enough.
See also: cockle, hot, sit

warm the cockles of (one's) heart

To cause one to feel happy. The "cockles of one's heart" are the deepest part of oneself. Thank you so much—your kind words really warmed the cockles of my heart.
See also: cockle, heart, of, warm

warm the cockles of someone's heart

Fig. to make someone feel warm and happy. It warms the cockles of my heart to hear you say that. Hearing that old song again warmed the cockles of her heart.
See also: cockle, heart, of, warm

warm the cockles of one's heart

Gratify one, make one feel good, as in It warms the cockles of my heart to see them getting along so well. This expression uses a corruption of the Latin name for the heart's ventricles, cochleae cordis. [Second half of 1600s]
See also: cockle, heart, of, warm

warm the cockles of your heart

BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If something warms the cockles of your heart, it makes you feel happy and contented. With its positive message and charming characters, this is a film to warm the cockles of your heart. In the dull grey setting, the sunny yellow colour of the house warmed the cockles of my heart. Note: Cockles are a type of shellfish. They are associated with the heart because they have a similar shape. The zoological name for cockles is `Cardium', which comes from the Greek word for `heart'.
See also: cockle, heart, of, warm

warm the cockles of someone's heart

give someone a comforting feeling of pleasure or contentment.
This phrase perhaps arose as a result of the resemblance in shape between a heart and a cockleshell.
See also: cockle, heart, of, warm

warm the ˈcockles (of somebody’s ˈheart)

(British English) make somebody feel happy or sympathetic: Ah! It warms the cockles of my heart to see the children so happy.
See also: cockle, warm

cockles of (one's) heart

One's innermost feelings: The valentine warmed the cockles of my heart.
See also: cockle, heart, of

warm the cockles of one's heart, to

To gratify; to make someone feel good. This term comes from the Latin for the heart’s ventricles, cochleas cordis, and has been used figuratively since the late seventeenth century. “This contrivance of his did inwardly rejoice the cockles of his heart,” wrote John Eachard (Observations upon the Answer to Contempt of Clergy, 1671).
See also: cockle, of, warm
References in periodicals archive ?
Today, cockles continue to be gathered using hand tools, but it is men, not women, who do the picking.
The amount of cockles over-cropped was 624kg more than the daily limit of 400kg.
6 THEY are high in zinc and a 100g portion of boiled cockles contains 53 calories.
"It's also to protect people from stomach bugs which can be contracted from cockles which are potentially dangerous, especially to children.
There are 50 licensed cockle pickers who must adhere to strict operating procedures and gather no more than 300kg of cockles every day.
Several hundred thousand pounds have been spent on trying to licence the cockle fishing but to no avail.
The estuary is home to one of the largest landings of the common cockle in Wales and provides a livelihood to around 50 fishermen, who operate under licenses issued by Environment Agency Wales.
Tim Holroyde QC, prosecuting, told the jury: "A team of Chinese cockle pickers were caught by the incoming tide in Morecambe Bay.
The cockle beds will be temporarily closed in a bid to prevent any further depletion of stocks.
Police were last night considering whether criminal charges would be brought against gangmasters involved in an alleged turf war between rival cockle picking gangs.
Studies have been made of the cockles' reproduction in Costa Rica (Cruz, 1984a, b, 1987a, b; Ampie and Cruz, 1989), population densities in Mexico (Baquiero, 1980), and associated macrofauna in Colombia (Squires et al., 1975; Blanco and Cantera, 1999).
Last year stocks were low resulting in the start of the season being delayed by two months at which point a vast spatfall appeared, meaning there is a large number of young cockles available now.
For generations "the cockle women of Penclawdd", each with their donkey, their cram, scrap and riddle, would be out on the sands in all weathers harvesting the plump, tasty cockles which have become part of Wales' culinary tradition, forming the basis of the famous Welsh breakfast of cockles, bacon and laverbread.
Mr McCandless warns that cockles picked by unlicensed gangs could contain e-coli and other bugs.
The North West Inshore Fisheries Conservation Authority (NWIFCA) closed the beds in Southport and Leasowe because there were insufficient adult cockles.