coax

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coax (someone or something) in(to) (something)

1. To convince or persuade a person or animal to enter something. It takes the promise of many songs and books to coax my kids into going to bed. Good luck coaxing the cat into her carrier—she's been hiding under the bed ever since she heard the word "vet."
2. To convince or persuade a person or animal to do something. Come on, see if you can coax her into dancing for us—I hear she's a trained ballroom dancer. Good luck coaxing the cat into going to the vet—she's been hiding under the bed ever since she heard the word "vet."
See also: coax

coax (someone or something) out of (something)

1. To convince or persuade a person or animal to exit something. Right, like I can coax a teenage boy out of bed before noon on a Saturday! Good luck coaxing the cat out of her carrier at the vet—she's already shaking in terror.
2. To convince or persuade a person or animal to relinquish something. I can't believe I coaxed this vintage lamp out of the guy at the yard sale for only $3! Good luck coaxing the cat out of her favorite seat in the house.
See also: coax, of, out

coax (someone or something) to (do something)

To convince or persuade a person or animal to do something. Come on, see if you can coax her to dance for us—I hear she's a trained ballroom dancer. Good luck coaxing the cat to give up her favorite seat in the house.
See also: coax, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

coax (someone or an animal) in (to something)

 
1. to urge or persuade someone or an animal to go into something. We coaxed the lion into the cage with fresh meat. The teacher coaxed the child into the kindergarten classroom.
2. to urge or persuade someone or an animal into doing something. We coaxed her into singing for us. Janet coaxed the dog into sitting up and begging.
See also: coax

coax (someone or an animal) out of something

 
1. to urge or persuade someone or an animal to give something up. He almost wouldn't sell it, but I coaxed him out of it. I coaxed the cat out of the canary it was holding in its mouth.
2. to urge or persuade someone or an animal to come out of something. She coaxed the puppy out of the carton. Janet coaxed the child out of the closet with a promise of a piece of cake.
See also: coax, of, out

coax someone to do something

to urge someone to do something. The kids coaxed her to let them go swimming. Can I coax you to try some of this pie?
See also: coax, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Using ribbons made of organic molecules as minuscule templates, researchers have coaxed a semiconductor material into tiny helical coils.
Carbon-60 fullerenes--cagelike molecules of 60 carbon atoms ([C.sub.60])--are easily coaxed into polymer chains.
A Colorado research team has coaxed an unprecedented number of microscopic particles--specifically, four beryllium ions--to share in a strange harmony known as quantum entanglement.
The scientists immediately coaxed local public and private agencies into recruiting volunteers to cull the affected waters of aquaculture debris and some 1.5 million large snails, which the pests also infect.
To study this discrepancy systematically, the researchers synthesized a group of 12 related compounds, coaxed them to grow into crystals, and identified their structures with X-ray diffraction.
Doctors had discarded sporulation as a possible explanation for tuberculosis' remarkable staying power because no one has ever successfully coaxed the bacterium to form spores in the lab.
By laying down bridges of Schwann cells -- cells that normally coat nerves -- researchers have coaxed severed nerve fibers in the spinal cords of adult rats to heal and grow toward each other.
In the July 26 NATURE, Jean-Marie Lehn of the Universite Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg, France, and co-workers describe how they coaxed molecular segments to self-assemble into double-helical molecules with DNA-like appendages.
In a remarkably simple triad of steps involving reagents such as ammonia and vinegar, the researchers coaxed a linear precursor to form six new chemical bonds and twist into proto-daphniphylline's complex structure comprising five rings and a few carbohydrate appendages.