coast

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coast along

To proceed with little effort. Because the route was mostly downhill, the car just coasted along. I'm worried that you're just coasting along through your senior year without taking your future seriously.
See also: coast

the coast is clear

It is safe to proceed, typically because no one is present or nearby who may interfere. I don't see the security guard, so go ahead—the coast is clear.
See also: clear, coast

coast to coast

1. From one side of the country to the other. Typically refers to the United States, which is bordered by oceans in the East and West. I've never seen the Pacific Ocean before, thanks to growing up in Boston, so I'm excited to travel coast to coast this summer.
2. Throughout the entire country. Typically refers to the United States, which is bordered by oceans in the East and West. This is not an isolated issue—it's affecting people coast to coast.
3. slang In basketball, a term used to describe an offensive play in which a player travels from one end of the court to the other to score a basket. Boy, he is quick! He went coast to coast past all five defenders.
See also: coast

from coast to coast

1. From one side of the country to the other. Typically refers to the United States, which is bordered by oceans in the East and West. I've never seen the Pacific Ocean before, thanks to growing up in Boston, so I'm excited to travel from coast to coast this summer.
2. Throughout the entire country. Typically refers to the United States, which is bordered by oceans in the East and West. This is not an isolated issue—it's affecting people from coast to coast.
3. slang In basketball, a term used to describe an offensive play in which a player travels from one end of the court to the other to score a basket. Boy, he is quick! He went from coast to coast past all five defenders.
See also: coast

coast along

to roll or move along with little or no effort. We just coasted along on the flat prairie. We coasted along until we came to the bottom of the hill.
See also: coast

coast is clear

There is no visible danger. I'm going to stay hidden here until the coast is clear. You can come out of your hiding place now. The coast is clear.
See also: clear, coast

coast-to-coast

from the Atlantic to the Pacific Oceans (in the continental U.S.A.); all the land between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans (considered in either direction). My voice was once heard on a coast-to-coast radio broadcast. Our car made the coast-to-coast trip in eighty hours.

coast is clear, the

No observers or authorities are present; one can proceed safely. For example, Let's make sure the coast is clear before we set up this surprise party. This expression may have originated among pirates and smugglers who were referring to the absence of coast guards, or with regard to a coastal military invasion, but no citations bear out these theories. By the late 1500s the term was used purely figuratively.
See also: coast

the coast is clear

If the coast is clear, you are able to do something, because nobody is there to see you doing it. `You can come out now,' he called. `The coast is clear. She's gone!' Midge stepped aside, nodding that the coast was clear, and Lettie ran through the lobby and up the main staircase. Note: This expression may refer to smugglers (= people who take things illegally into a country) sending messages that there were no coastguards near and it was safe to land or set sail.
See also: clear, coast

the coast is clear

there is no danger of being observed or caught.
The coast is clear originally meant that there were no enemies guarding a sea coast who would prevent an attempt to land or embark.
See also: clear, coast

the ˌcoast is ˈclear

(informal) there is no one around to see or stop what you are doing: She looked left and right to make sure the coast was clear, then ran as fast as she could down the corridor.
See also: clear, coast

left coast

n. the west coast of the U.S. There is some weird stuff going on out on the left coast.
See also: coast, left
References in classic literature ?
Alexander M'Kay, had accompanied Sir Alexander Mackenzie in both of his expeditions to the northwest coast of America in 1789 and 1793.
The parties of the second part were to execute faithfully such duties as might be assigned to them by a majority of the company on the northwest coast, and to repair to such place or places as the majority might direct.
An agent, appointed for the term of five years, was to reside at the principal establishment on the northwest coast, and Wilson Price Hunt was the one chosen for the first term.
It 's no harm, and Polly shall coast if she wants to; may n't she, grandma?
I just wanted to say, if you 'll come out to-morrow some time, we 'll have a good coast.
I 'm not mad, either; but I don't mean to coast any more.
Polly had been taught that it was a very serious and sacred thing; and, according to her notions, it was far more improper to flirt with one boy than to coast with a dozen.
The Coast Starlight is Amtrak's premier train route,'' said Lee Groth, a former Davenport, Fla.
In the meantime, the Coast Starlight runs on, daily, between Los Angeles and Seattle, offering sleeper accommodations and coach seats on a trip of 35 hours.
Although the Coast Starlight runs no farther south than Los Angeles - to the dismay of many long-haul travelers - the Pacific Surfliner rolls down to San Diego, though without sleeper accommodations and a formal Dining Car.
On the Coast Starlight, the Sightseer Lounge has domed windows for optimal viewing of all that superb scenery.
The passing diorama is endlessly fascinating, even when the train isn't skirting the coast.
The Coast Starlight runs on track owned by Union Pacific, and UP's freight trains often take priority.
Traffic was shut down and the southbound Coast Starlight, which had been running on time, didn't reach Union Station until after 5 a.
In the meantime, passengers can sit back and enjoy the landscape of Vandenberg Air Force Base, off-limits to everyone but train travelers, where a vast reserve of Central Coast beauty is punctuated only by the occasional missile launching pad.