coalesce into (something)

(redirected from coalesced into)

coalesce into (something)

For two or more separate thing to merge or form into one thing. Initially, I wasn't sure if the movie was a drama or comedy, but it coalesced nicely into a dramedy as the plot unfolded.
See also: coalesce

coalesce into something

[for two or more things] to blend or fuse and become one thing. The fading colors coalesced into a gray blur. In the distance, the crowd coalesced into a single blob.
See also: coalesce
References in classic literature ?
The sweat stood out on their skin in myriads of tiny drops that ran together, forming blotches of moisture, which, in turn, coalesced into rivulets that dripped to the ground.
That kind of intimacy blossomed in the three-person pieces, especially as performers coalesced into blissful circles--face to face, joining hands--amid longing or strife.
Debris from the collision coalesced into Charon, with a bit left over to make the newfound moons.
Untold ages later they coalesced into our own solar system forming our Sun, Earth, oceans, mountains, griptape with holes in it and, eventually, Bam Margera's Right Guard contract.
All thes and more coalesced into a bright and rewarding museum experience.
At 200,000 times atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 2,500 kelvins, the powder coalesced into an extraordinarily hard, dense, black plug about the size of a poppy seed.
Couples often coalesced into groups; others exchanged partners, disappeared, and reemerged in a steady stream of exits and entrances.
5 billion years ago, spewing material that coalesced into the moon.
Star-forming galaxies were common when the universe was young, but most apparently coalesced into even larger galaxies.
As these tiny fragments coalesced into larger rocks, the fragments' individual magnetic fields could have ended up in random orientations.
The new images of the star fit with the standard model of the early solar system at a time when most dust had coalesced into planets, but "there was still lots of stuff whizzing around and impacting the Earth," Greaves says.
Alternatively, the clouds may consist of pristine material, forged a few minutes after the birth of the universe, that never formed stars or coalesced into galaxies.
Archaeological evidence of how settlements sprinkled along the Nile Valley coalesced into one of the world's first civilizations remains murky.