clown

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class clown

A mischievous or impudent student who frequently disrupts the class with jokes, pranks, or wry comments as a means of drawing attention to him- or herself. Every teacher has to deal with class clowns eventually.
See also: class, clown

clown around

slang To joke, play, or otherwise behave in a silly way. I can see you boys clowning around back there! Sit down and do the math problems I assigned. The kids are just clowning around with each other in the back yard, if you want to call them for dinner.
See also: around, clown

clown around (with someone)

Fig. to join with someone in acting silly; [for two or more people] to act silly together. The boys were clowning around with each other. The kids are having fun clowning around.
See also: around, clown

clown

n. a fool. Tell that clown in the front row to shut up.

clown around

in. to act silly; to mess around. We were just clowning around. We didn’t mean to break anything.
See also: around, clown
References in periodicals archive ?
The sinister trend has carried over onto social media, with a number of reports of people setting up Twitter or Facebook accounts as clowns and making threats to attack schools.
ChildLine has been dealing with calls from children terrified by the wave of clown sightings, with volunteers in both Cardiff and Prestatyn delivering counselling sessions online and over the phone.
James Kelly wrote: "Some people have a genuine fear of clowns, I have family member who hates them and it's not funny.
Worried parents say older children wearing masks and clown suits have been chasing young kids in Dunbar.
Australian police have issued strong warnings to those dressing as clowns, saying they could be committing criminal acts or become victims if scared citizens attack them.
Social media users also have claimed creepy clowns have been spotted on Coburg Road near McKenzie View Drive, and in the town of Coburg.
The Clown Doctors New Zealand Charitable Trust started in Christchurch in 2009 and expanded to Auckland in 2010 and Wellington in 2012.
But children's entertainer Bob Bonkers laughed off claims that clowns were in danger of dying out.
The painting "Clown on Stairs" featured an innocent-looking clown trying to climb a wooden ladder, with one foot on a water glass and the other on a wobbly table.
Those taking part earned points for each event they won and the clown that picked up the most points was awarded the title of Clown Athlete of the Year.
After attracting a bull's attention, rodeo clowns might try to escape the bull by climbing out of the arena or by taking cover behind a barrel that's in the arena.
And in this partnering (which is the currency by which clowns equalize value) what system hasn't gained status against the figure of the clown-hero attempting to subdue it, and failing, falling, rising up again, failing, and falling, and rising up again.
One of them said, `My brother is the president of Central Mass Clowns, you need to call him.
If you need the correct answer, it could be the makeup, or the circus, but the proper answer is that we all laugh at the clowns.
Although the title implies a comprehensive approach to English clowning, the book is concerned primarily with the specific instances of clowns operating as "religio-political" satirists, more specifically: the use of blackface fools, the adoption of traditions of misrule by religious propagandists, the puritan as clown in pamphlet satire and on the stage, and the royal fool as evinced by the two editions of Shakespeare's King Lear.