clothe


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clothe (someone/oneself) in (something)

To dress someone or oneself in something She clothes her newborn in the cutest outfits. I clothed myself in a beautiful gown for the gala.
See also: clothe

clothe someone in something

to dress someone in something. She clothed her children in the finest garments. He clothed himself in his tuxedo for the wedding.
See also: clothe
References in classic literature ?
Finally I was carried off in one direction, and my perilous clothes in another.
Besides, I considered that my clothes and shoes would soon wear out, which already were in a declining condition, and must be supplied by some contrivance from the hides of YAHOOS, or other brutes; whereby the whole secret would be known.
Those must indeed be splendid clothes,' thought the Emperor.
When the husband prosecutes his wife's gallant, if he can produce any proofs of a criminal conversation, he recovers for damages forty cows, forty horses, and forty suits of clothes, and the same number of other things.
LITTLE Benjamin said that the first thing to be done was to get back Peter's clothes, in order that they might be able to use the pocket handkerchief.
All the clothing of the two was still in the room--if they had gone then they must have gone naked or in their night clothes.
I want to take all our dirty clothes to the river and wash them.
She thinks there's nothing belongs to being a lady's maid but wearing finer clothes nor she was born to, I'll be bound.
The loss of his clothes hardly mattered, because He had seven coats on when he came, With three pairs of boots--but the worst of it was, He had wholly forgotten his name.
So she called the Winkies to help her, and they walked all that day and part of the next until they came to the tall tree in the branches of which the Winged Monkeys had tossed the Scarecrow's clothes.
Then they took away her fine clothes, and gave her an old grey frock to put on, and laughed at her, and turned her into the kitchen.
I was one myself once, though not long--not so long as my clothes.
Be still, my dear Porthos," resumed D'Artagnan, becoming slightly impatient, "I don't understand why your clothes should not fit you, because Mouston has grown stouter.
I never see a filthy yard that I do not want to clean it, a paling off of a fence that I do not want to put it on, an unpainted or unwhitewashed house that I do not want to pain or whitewash it, or a button off one's clothes, or a grease-spot on them or on a floor, that I do not want to call attention to it.
This was done by dumping them into a spinning receptacle that went at a rate of a few thousand revolutions a minute, tearing the matter from the clothes by centrifugal force.