closing


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Related to closing: closing time, Closing Sales

closing time

The time at which an establishment closes for the day. Aw man, it's closing time already? I barely got any of my shopping done! I think we can squeeze in one more beer before it's closing time!
See also: closing, time

close a/the deal

To reach an agreement with another party, thus concluding negotiations. We need to move in a month, so how quickly can you close a deal and get our house sold? After months of negotiating, I hired a high-powered attorney to finally close the deal.
See also: close, deal

close a/the sale

To reach an agreement with a buyer; to finalize a sale by persuading the interested party to complete the purchase. We need to move in a month, so how quickly can you close a sale? Obviously, we're looking for salespeople who can consistently close the sale.
See also: close, sale

close down

1. To cease business operations for any length of time (often permanently). I loved that restaurant, so I'm very disappointed that it closed down. That shop always closes down for two weeks in the summer to accommodate the owner's vacation.
2. To force a business to cease operations. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is often used between "close" and "down." After a thorough investigation, the police were finally able to close the shop down for money laundering.
See also: close, down

close in

1. To physically surround, encircle, or approach someone or something. As the opposing troops closed in on us, I knew we would never win the battle.
2. To trap or confine someone or something in a particular space. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "close" and "in." The blizzard has closed us in, unfortunately, and we won't even be able to go skiing.
3. To approach very quickly or become imminent, as of a deadline.
4. To overwhelm or engulf someone, as of emotions.
See also: close

close in on (one)

1. To physically surround, encircle, or approach someone or something. As the opposing troops closed in on us, I knew we would never win the battle. When I'm in a small space for too long, I start to feel as though the walls are closing in on me.
2. To overwhelm or engulf someone, as of emotions. For a long time, I couldn't drive because feelings of fear closed in on me every time I got behind the wheel.
3. To approach very quickly or become imminent, as of a deadline or other requirement. I procrastinated, and now the deadline for my paper is really closing in on me!
See also: close, on

close in for the kill

1. Literally, to approach someone or something with the intent of killing it. The lion closed in for the kill when it saw the injured antelope.
2. By extension, to approach someone or something with the intent to achieve a particular outcome. If someone finally shows interest in buying the house, I'm sure our realtor will close in for the kill.
See also: close, kill

close off

1. To prevent access to a particular area or thing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "close" and "off." We had to close off that section of the restaurant for a private party. I had to take a detour on my way home because the water department closed off a bunch of streets.
2. To avoid emotional connection with others; to isolate. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun can be used between "close" and "off." Todd really closed himself off after his last break-up. I have a hard time making friends because I usually close myself off from other people.
3. To refuse to listen to viewpoints, ideas, or opinions that differ from one's own. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun can be used between "close" and "off." Grandpa, you can't just close yourself off to the ways of the modern world. Can you please listen to what I think, instead of automatically closing yourself off?
See also: close, off

close on

To complete the process of buying or selling property, most often a house. In this usage, "close on" is a set phrase followed by a noun or pronoun. So when do you guys finally close on the new house?
See also: close, on

close out

1. verb To prevent from entering a certain place or area. A noun or pronoun can be used between "close" and "out." Keep that door shut—I'm trying to close out the bugs.
2. verb To sell the remaining inventory of an item that will not be restocked. A noun or pronoun can be used between "close" and "out." We need close out this model of TV, so we're offering a deep discount.
3. verb To end the registration period for something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "close" and "out." I'm sorry, so many people signed up for the workshop that we had to close it out.
4. verb To exclude one from something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "close" and "out." I'm in this relationship too, so stop closing me out of decisions. Unfortunately, we got to the studio late and were closed out of the class.
5. verb To bring about the end of something; to conclude something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "close" and "out." If the home team wins tonight, they can close out this playoff series and move on to the next round.
6. verb To discontinue something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "close" and "out." What steps do I have to take to close out my account with your bank?
7. adjective A sale of the remaining inventory of an item that will not be restocked, usually at a significant discount. In this usage, the phrase is typically hyphenated or written as one word. I bought so many things because the store was having a big close-out sale.
See also: close, out

close (one) out of (something)

To exclude one from something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "close" and "out." I'm in this relationship too, so stop closing me out of decisions. Unfortunately, the teacher closed us out of the class because we got to the lecture hall late.
See also: close, of, out

close ranks

1. Literally, to move closer to the other troops while in a military formation. As soon as the captain called for us to close ranks, we all moved closer together.
2. By extension, to show support for someone or something, especially as a response to criticism. This phrase is typically applied to a group of people. Our family was sure to close ranks behind mom as she suffered public backlash during her campaign for mayor.
See also: close, rank

close the door on (something)

1. Literally, to shut a door on something else, usually accidentally. Whoa, hang on, I closed the door on my gown! I accidentally closed the door on my finger, and I think it might be broken.
2. To hinder something; to make something impossible. If they find out that you lied on your resume, it will definitely close the door on this job opportunity.
3. To conclude something. Graduation will close the door on my high school experience.
See also: close, door, on

close up

1. verb Literally, to shut something that is open. Be sure to close up the oven after you take out the cookies.
2. verb To sew an opening shut at the end of a surgical procedure. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "close" and "up." The procedure is finished. Now we need to close him up.
3. verb To heal, as of a cut or wound. The cut isn't too deep, so it should close up on its own, no stitches needed.
4. verb To become completely closed or sealed shut. After I got hit in the face with a baseball, my eye swelled so much that it actually closed up.
5. verb To cease business operations for any length of time (often permanently). I loved that restaurant, so I'm very disappointed that it closed up permanently. That shop always closes up for two weeks in the summer to accommodate the owner's vacation.
6. verb To close something, typically a place, securely. I hope you closed up the store before you left for the night.
7. noun A shot in which the camera is positioned very close to the subject. In this usage, the phrase is typically hyphenated. I want the next scene to start with a close-up of Caroline standing in the doorway. Her close-ups of flowers are just gorgeous—she's a very underrated photographer.
8. noun A detailed or intimate portrayal or exploration of something. In this usage, the phrase is typically hyphenated. This novel is a close-up of Depression-era America. You need to close up shop and go home—your shift ended an hour ago.
See also: close, up

close up shop

To cease business operations for any length of time (often permanently). This phrase can be used to describe an enterprise or an employee. I loved that restaurant, so I'm very disappointed that it closed up shop. The owner always closes up shop for two weeks in the summer to accommodate her vacation.
See also: close, shop, up

closing the stable door after the horse has bolted

Trying to prevent or rectify a problem after the damage has already been done. If you try to replace the oil filter on the engine now, you're just closing the stable door after the horse has bolted.

close down

 and shut down
[for someone] to close a business, office, shop, etc., permanently or temporarily. This shop will have to close down if they raise taxes. The fire department closed down all the stores on the block because of the gas leak.
See also: close, down

close in for the kill

 and move in for the kill 
1. Lit. to move in on someone or something for the purpose of killing. The wolves closed in for the kill. When the lions closed in for the kill, the zebras began to stampede.
2. Fig. to get ready to do the final and climactic part of something. The car salesman closed in for the kill with contract and pen in hand.
See also: close, kill

close in

 (on someone or something)
1. Lit. to move inward on someone or something. The cops were closing in on the thugs. They closed in quietly and trapped the bear.
2. Fig. [for threats or negative feelings] to overwhelm or seem to surround someone or something. My problems are closing in on me. I feel trapped. Everything is closing in.
See also: close

close on something

to formally complete the sale and transfer of property, especially real estate. We closed on the new house on April 16. We were able to close on our old house on June 2.
See also: close, on

close ranks

to move closer together in a military formation. The soldiers closed ranks and marched on the enemy in tight formation.
See also: close, rank

close ranks

(behind someone or something) to support someone or something; to back someone or something. We will close ranks behind the party's nominee. Let's close ranks behind her and give her the support she needs.
See also: close, rank

close ranks (with someone)

to join with someone in a cause, or agreement. We can fight this menace only if we close ranks. Let's all close ranks with Ann and adopt her suggestions.
See also: close, rank

close someone or something down

to force someone or someone's business, office, shop, etc., to close permanently or temporarily. The health department closed the restaurant down. They closed down the same place last year, too.
See also: close, down

close someone or something in (something)

to contain someone or something in something or some place; to seal someone or something inside something. Don't close the bird in such a small cage. Don't close me in! Leave the door open.
See also: close

close someone up

to close a surgical wound at the end of a surgical procedure. Fred, would you close her up for me? Fred closed up the patient.
See also: close, up

close something off

to prevent entrance into something; to block something off. Please don't close this passageway off. They closed off the passageway anyway.
See also: close, off

close something out

 
1. to sell off a particular kind of merchandise with the intention of not selling it in the future. These are not selling. Let's close them out. They closed out all of last season's merchandise.
2. to prevent further registration in something. We are going to have to close this class out. The registrar closed out the class.
See also: close, out

close something up

 
1. to close someone's business, office, shop, etc., temporarily or permanently. Tom's restaurant nearly went out of business when the health department closed him up. The health department closed up the restaurant.
2. to close something that is open, such as a door or a box. Please close the door when you leave.
See also: close, up

close up

 
1. Lit. [for an opening] to close completely. The door closed up and would not open again. The wound will close up completely in a day or so.
2. Fig. [for a place of business] to close for business. The store closed up and did not open until the next day.
See also: close, up

close up shop

Fig. to quit working, for the day or forever. (Fixed order.) It's five o'clock. Time to close up shop. I can't make any money in this town. The time has come to close up shop and move to another town.
See also: close, shop, up

close down

1. Also, close one's doors; shut down. Go out of business, end operations. For example, If the rent goes up we'll have to close down, or After fifty years in business the store finally closed its doors, or The warehouse had a clearance sale the month before it shut down for good. Also see close up, def. 2.
2. Force someone to go out of business, as in The police raided the porn shop and closed it down. Both usages date from the early 1900s, but shut down was first recorded in 1877.
See also: close, down

close in

1. Surround, enclose, envelop, as in The fog closed in and we couldn't see two yards in front of us, or She felt the room was closing in. [c. 1400]
2. Also, close in on or upon . Draw in, approach, as in The police closed in on the suspect. [Early 1800s]
See also: close

close out

1. Also, close something out. Dispose of a stock of goods; end a business. For example, We are closing out all our china, or They've decided to close out their downtown branch. This expression is most often used in business and commerce but occasionally refers to other matters. [Late 1800s]
2. close someone out. Prevent someone's entry or inclusion, as in No one will tell us about the merger-we've been closed out. [Second half of 1900s]
See also: close, out

close ranks

Unite, work together, as in The members decided to close ranks and confront the president. This expression, dating from the late 1700s, comes from the military, where it denotes bringing troops into close order so there are no gaps in the fighting line. (A slightly earlier form was close lines.) It has been used figuratively since the mid-1800s.
See also: close, rank

close the sale

Also, close the deal; close on a sale or deal . Complete a transaction, as in Jack was delighted to close the sale. This term applies to such transactions as the sale of a house, also put as closing on a house, as well as negotiations leading up to a sale. The latter was also put as to close a bargain, a phrase used by Charles Dickens and other 19th-century writers: "He closed the bargain directly it reached his ears," Nicholas Nickleby, 1838.
See also: close, sale

close up

Also, close up shop. Stop doing business, temporarily or permanently; also, stop working. For example, The bank is closing up all its overseas branches, or That's enough work for one day-I'm closing up shop and going home. [Late 1500s]
See also: close, up

close ranks

COMMON If the members of a group close ranks, they say things to show that they support each other totally when someone who is not in their group criticizes one of their members. Note: A rank of soldiers is a line of them standing side by side. They would more likely close ranks and support their president rather than abandon him in an election year. Cabinet ministers have closed ranks behind the Prime Minister, saying there was no question of his stepping down. Note: When soldiers close ranks, they stand closer together so that it is hard for anyone to break through the line.
See also: close, rank

close down

v.
1. To stop operating permanently or for an extended period of time. Used especially of businesses: After decades of serving the community, the gymnasium closed down.
2. To force someone or something, as a business, to stop operating: The cops closed down our poker game. I'd like to keep the shop running, but the recession will probably close my business down.
See also: close, down

close in

v.
1. To surround and advance on a person or thing: The police located the escaped prisoner and closed in. Scientists closed in on the cause of the disease.
2. To appear to be coming in from all sides: Problems of every sort are closing in on me.
3. To be about to occur; be imminent: We had better hurry, the deadline is closing in.
See also: close

close off

v.
To prevent passage along or through something: The police closed off the main avenue for a parade. Park rangers closed the lake off to motorboats.
See also: close, off

close out

v.
1. To block someone or something from entering some place: I shut the windows to close out the light. The management closed the striking union out from the factory.
2. To refuse to include someone in a group or activity: The tour guide had to close out many people who wanted to come on the trip because the bus was full. The school closed me out of the class because I registered too late.
3. To discontinue the sale of some merchandise: The store is closing out its old line of hiking boots, so they're on sale. This is a good brand of refrigerator, so buy one before the store closes them out.
4. To terminate something, as a business or an account, by disposing of all its assets: She opened a new bank account and closed out the old one. He closed his savings account out and bought a new car.
5. To bring some activity to an end: This performance will close out our program for the evening. Just when we thought the tennis match might go to a third set, one of the players closed it out with two aces.
See also: close, out

close up

v.
1. To shut something completely: The doctor closed up the cut with stitches. I closed the box up with wire and tape.
2. To become shut completely: My eye closed up because of the infection.
3. To shut and lock a building for a period of time: It's my job to close up the store for the night because I'm always the last one to leave. At the end of August, we'll close the cottage up for the winter.
See also: close, up
References in periodicals archive ?
Jones and Hylick faced the challenges that a multitude of home buyers face at the closing (also called the settlement), the meeting in which the sale of property is finalized.
Last month, the supervisors voted 3-1 to begin the process of closing the trauma unit, which treats about 2,000 patients annually.
A list of position tides of those persons who will be the parties responsible for performance under the closing agreement, including their names, addresses and phone numbers as of the date the application is submitted.
section] 1831r-1), as implemented by the Joint Policy Statement Regarding Branch Closings (64 Federal Register 34,844 (1999)), requires that a bank provide the public with at lest 30 days' notice and the appropriate federal supervisory agency with at lest 90 days' notice before the date of a proposed branch closing.
A more common scenario is that companies -- while not able to perform a textbook virtual close -- have significantly decreased their closing cycles.
Good nursing home employees displaced by a closing facility usually have few problems finding jobs at other nursing homes.
While not financing closing costs, this method redistributes the amount needed to close escrow.
As of the Closing Date, Company expects to have at least $ in current and accumulated earnings and profits.
Aligning with LSSI combines our compliance technology with a respected authority on closing documents," said David Girling, president and CEO for ComplianceEase.
The onus, however, is on the professional to investigate any potential problems prior to the closing.
7121(b), closing agreements are final in the absence of fraud, malfeasance or misrepresentation; in fact, courts have enforced closing agreements even if the tax at issue is later declared unconstitutional.
The citizens are being sold office space for response time,'' said Joan Kelley, a Van Nuys resident who campaigned for Zine because of his opposition to the jail closing.
The combination of Hyperion System 9 and Movaris' OneClose solution for compliance, close automation and account reconciliations is a truly innovative way of confidently addressing the closing process within the management cycle.
Many projects are well underway and are currently in the closing stage, while others have not even broken ground.
The incident at Grant comes on the heels of a spate of asbestos-related problems around the district that has forced the closure of two high schools and the partial closing of several others.