close up

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close up

1. verb Literally, to shut something that is open. Be sure to close up the oven after you take out the cookies.
2. verb To sew an opening shut at the end of a surgical procedure. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "close" and "up." The procedure is finished. Now we need to close him up.
3. verb To heal, as of a cut or wound. The cut isn't too deep, so it should close up on its own, no stitches needed.
4. verb To become completely closed or sealed shut. After I got hit in the face with a baseball, my eye swelled so much that it actually closed up.
5. verb To cease business operations for any length of time (often permanently). I loved that restaurant, so I'm very disappointed that it closed up permanently. That shop always closes up for two weeks in the summer to accommodate the owner's vacation.
6. verb To close something, typically a place, securely. I hope you closed up the store before you left for the night.
7. noun A shot in which the camera is positioned very close to the subject. In this usage, the phrase is typically hyphenated. I want the next scene to start with a close-up of Caroline standing in the doorway. Her close-ups of flowers are just gorgeous—she's a very underrated photographer.
8. noun A detailed or intimate portrayal or exploration of something. In this usage, the phrase is typically hyphenated. This novel is a close-up of Depression-era America.
See also: close, up

close someone up

to close a surgical wound at the end of a surgical procedure. Fred, would you close her up for me? Fred closed up the patient.
See also: close, up

close something up

 
1. to close someone's business, office, shop, etc., temporarily or permanently. Tom's restaurant nearly went out of business when the health department closed him up. The health department closed up the restaurant.
2. to close something that is open, such as a door or a box. Please close the door when you leave.
See also: close, up

close up

 
1. Lit. [for an opening] to close completely. The door closed up and would not open again. The wound will close up completely in a day or so.
2. Fig. [for a place of business] to close for business. The store closed up and did not open until the next day.
See also: close, up

close up

Also, close up shop. Stop doing business, temporarily or permanently; also, stop working. For example, The bank is closing up all its overseas branches, or That's enough work for one day-I'm closing up shop and going home. [Late 1500s]
See also: close, up

close up

v.
1. To shut something completely: The doctor closed up the cut with stitches. I closed the box up with wire and tape.
2. To become shut completely: My eye closed up because of the infection.
3. To shut and lock a building for a period of time: It's my job to close up the store for the night because I'm always the last one to leave. At the end of August, we'll close the cottage up for the winter.
See also: close, up
References in periodicals archive ?
The extreme close-up images are raw and vulgar, naked and without redeeming value.
Despite Diamond's virtuosic capacity with video equipment, he is a purist because of his dance background--he doesn't tape facial close-ups, shots of someone's hand, nor does he rechoreograph a performance.
The narrative spareness and ponderous tempo of Graham's film, however, remove the Rheinmetall from any such worldly associations: A series of lingering close-ups make it initially seem that the artist's sole aim was to pore fetishistically over every one of the machine's precisely tooled components.
The camera may circle the performers provocatively or concentrate in radical close-ups on the textured face of a passionately wailing singer, the deft fingers of a guitarist, or the supple torso of a silhouetted dancer.
The unpleasantly slick adverts on the gallery walls feature close-ups of a client's naked body overlaid with testimonials, such as "I hesitate to put my finger on what is 'happening.
The extreme close-ups show a surface littered with rocks as well as finer debris.
Emptying the film of its ostensible content and laying bare the film's mechanics, rendering long shots, close-ups, and pans generic, the device voids the narrative's affective potential.