clog


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clogs to clogs in three generations

The idea that a family can escape poverty for a time but then become impoverished again, all in the span of three generations. Primarily heard in UK. With the way you're spending our family's money, we'll be clogs to clogs in three generations!
See also: clog, generation, three

clever clogs

A light-hearted or humorous way to refer to an intelligent or clever person. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. He's such a clever clogs. There is no question he can't answer.
See also: clever, clog

clog up

1. To obstruct. A noun or pronoun can be used between "clog" and "up." This cold is clogging up my nose and I can hardly breathe.
2. To make constipated. A noun or pronoun can be used between "clog" and "up." That type of food always clogs me up—I was constipated for days the last time I ate it.
See also: clog, up

clog (something) with (something)

To obstruct something with something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "clog" and "up." This cold has clogged my nose with so much mucus that I can hardly breathe. One of the kids clogged the pipes with action figures.
See also: clog

pop (one's) clogs

To die. Primarily heard in UK. A friend of mine is convinced he's going to pop his clogs whenever he feels the slightest bit unwell.
See also: clog, pop

clog someone up

[for some kind of food] to constipate someone. This cheese clogs me up. I can't eat it. This food clogs up people who eat it.
See also: clog, up

clog something up

[for something] to obstruct a channel or conduit. The leaves clogged the gutters up. They clogged up the gutter.
See also: clog, up

clog something with something

to block or obstruct a channel or conduit with something. The neighbors clogged the creek with their brush and leaves. Please don't clog the drain with garbage.
See also: clog

clog up

[for a channel or conduit] to become blocked. The canal clogged up with leaves and mud.
See also: clog, up

pop your clogs

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If someone pops their clogs, they die. He popped his clogs halfway through the performance. Note: This expression is used to refer to someone's death in a light-hearted or humorous way. Note: This expression may refer to an old sense of `pop', meaning to pawn something (= borrow some money in return for a valuable object that you leave with the lender. The lender can sell the object if you do not pay the money back). Clogs used to be the normal footwear of people such as mill workers, especially in the north of England.
See also: clog, pop

clogs to clogs in three generations

the return of a family to poverty after one generation of prosperity.
See also: clog, generation, three

pop your clogs

die. British informal
The expression, which is first recorded in 1970 , probably comes from the idea of ‘popping’ (i.e. pawning) a person's clogs after they have died (and therefore have no further use for them). It may well also have been influenced, though, by the colloquial pop off meaning ‘die’, which dates back to the mid 18th century.
1998 Oldie We cannot claim any credit for foreseeing that Enoch was about to pop his clogs.
See also: clog, pop

pop your ˈclogs

(British English, humorous) die: I haven’t seen you for so long I thought you’d popped your clogs!
See also: clog, pop

clog up

v.
1. To obstruct some passageway: The fallen leaves clogged up the drainpipe. The sediment clogged the pipe up.
2. To cause something to become obstructed: I clogged up the sink with some leftover food. This nagging cold has clogged my sinuses up.
3. To become obstructed: Call the plumber; the toilet clogged up again.
See also: clog, up
References in periodicals archive ?
"The clogs themselves are very loud so the place is very noisy and full of life."
Clog dancer Rebecca Adamson of >Wall in Northumberland
"We're keen for forgotten gems such as Northumbrian rapper sword dancing and clog dancing to make a resurgence and it's great to see the reactions these dance styles have on audiences watching and taking part.
Influence of Landfill Leachate Suspended Solids on Clog (Biorock) Formation, International Journal of Integrated Waste Management, Science and Technology 24: 723-738.
Director Danny Kilbride said: "Over recent years there has been a significant rise in interest in Welsh traditional clog dancing with new groups starting up all over the country.
It is believed that Thomas James' workshop dates back to the first quarter of the 20th century, and it was here that this traditional clog maker honed his craft until the beginning of the '60s.
3: Feeling generous: From Next, these sling-back clogs look comfy yet stylish for pounds 38.
Clog industry in Damascus, which spread in the 1950s, is threatened with extinction nowadays.
One thing I have brought back from LA is a love of clogs. Our LA sisters have fully embraced the clog trend.
CLOG CAPERS WHATEVER your holiday destination, make you're going Dutc your footwear.
4 : to clog or become clogged by ice <Water pipes froze overnight.>
It has to be said that Roy at that time had no idea that Pat was a clog dancer.
The co-curable ink has been designed and proven to not only provide a high-quality pigmented contrast, which will neither transfer nor clog vents during the process, but, more importantly, contains adhesive properties that allow the ink to be applied to any internal component of a tire or rubber compound.
If the pans fill up, dust can be pulled back through the system to clog the filters.
The move to stents has paid dividends, but within a few months after they are implanted, about 20 percent of bare-metal stents clog. The blockages are made up of cells and proteins similar to those that form a scab, says cardiologist Gregg W.