clock-watcher


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clock-watcher

One who often checks the time during an activity or event, as due to boredom and/or a desire to leave. He's a total clock-watcher, so I doubt that he likes his job.

clock-watcher

someone -- a worker or a student -- who is always looking at the clock, anticipating when something will be over. There are four clock-watchers in our office. People who don't like their jobs can turn into clockwatchers.

clock watcher

n. someone—a worker or a student—who is always looking at the clock. People who don’t like their jobs can turn into clock watchers.
See also: clock, watcher
References in periodicals archive ?
Cautious clock-watchers are more likely to be male, less educated, have moderate income and savings levels, and are most likely to be working full-time.
Mr Foster assured concerned clock-watchers the time would be correct next year.
We're not saying that we should turn into a nation of clock-watchers.
Regional secretary Roger McKenzie said: "We're not saying that we should turn into a nation of clock-watchers.
But residents of Herefordshire appear to be clock-watchers who leave the office as soon as they can.
Such children become clock-watchers, lying in bed and growing increasingly frustrated as time passes and they are unable to sleep.
Another common complaint about cost-plus contracts is that they turn homeowners into clock-watchers.
Again, the Elmaamul colt impressed clock-watchers when winning his private trial in Dubai earlier this month.
Even worse is his choice for the law's enforcement agency: the lumbering clock-watchers at the Federal Trade Commission.
Furthermore, the clock-watchers suggest she has at least two runs that compare favourably with the best Kiyoshi or Tapestry have shown.
Or, for clock-watchers, it had been Arnaud Clement and Fabrice Santoro's 6hr 33min classic at the 2004 French Open.
Beneath its cosy pipe and slippers exterior there beat a very dark heart indeed, with Reggie becoming an icon for the disaffected, the put upon, the clock-watchers and the daydreamers.
What they find most difficult is coming to terms with civilian clock-watchers and poor timekeepers.
The people of Cardiff can be accused of many things, but not of being clock-watchers.
Of course they aren't, just as older people aren't stuck in their ways, resistant to change, clock-watchers or simply waiting for retirement.