climb on(to) (someone or something)

(redirected from climb onto)

climb on(to) (someone or something)

To mount someone or something. We can reach the cookies on that shelf if you climb on my back. I was nervous, but I climbed onto the horse nonetheless.
See also: climb

climb on(to) something

 and climb on
to ascend to or mount something. I climbed onto the side of the truck. Tommy climbed on the truck.
See also: climb, on
References in periodicals archive ?
Police attempted to control the angry mob as they struggled with officers and tried to climb onto a police van, which was parked outside the courts.
You made a conscious decision to climb onto the roofs of a number of terraced houses.
He managed to climb onto the roof of the semi-detached house.
Three policemen who had to climb onto the roof of one of the six illegally built wooden structures to get a settler who was refusing to be evacuated were lightly injured when the roof collapsed," Rosenfeld said.
It's great for toning the upper body and thighs as you need strong muscles to hold the board and climb onto it while treading water.
The men were in no immediate danger but they could have been hurt trying to climb onto the pier, so the best option was to evacuate them.
According to reports, the deluge has entered the residential areas of Dera Allah Yar, prompting people to climb onto their rooftops.
The boy managed to climb onto a windowsill in his family's apartment and then fell to the street below.
Tim Crawford, economist at Halifax, said: "First-time buyers continue to struggle to climb onto the property ladder.
His improvised performance never would have occurred if not for Kay Dell, the Santa Clarita woman poised at the keyboard, who allowed the energetic boy to climb onto her lap and find his inner musician.
The men managed to scramble from the car through the windows and climb onto the roof of the vehicle, which was in deep water some distance from the shore.
GIOVANNI van Bronckhorst thought someone was having a laugh when he saw Michael Mols climb onto the bus for training on Friday.
A man finishes examining the endless strip of Edward Ruscha service-station photos on the walls and turns to watch a thin guy in a cowboy hat and a fancy western suit climb onto the empty bandstand.
When they transform into winged adults, they climb onto a rock, then skim to shore.