client


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a man who is his own lawyer has a fool for a client

A man who tries to defend himself, rather than hiring a trained lawyer, is a fool. A: "What do you mean, a lawyer? I'm going to represent myself!" B: "Well, just keep in mind that a man who is his own lawyer has a fool for a client."
See also: client, fool, lawyer, man, own, who

an attorney who represents himself has a fool for a client

proverb Choosing to represent yourself in court rather than hiring a lawyer is usually very unwise. A: "I'm licensed and all, so I'm just going to represent myself. What's the problem?" B: "Well, you know what they say—an attorney who represents himself has a fool for a client."
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
Vholes," explains the client, somewhat abashed, "I had no intention to accuse you of insensibility."
Vholes, after glancing at the official cat who is patiently watching a mouse's hole, fixes his charmed gaze again on his young client and proceeds in his buttoned-up, half-audible voice as if there were an unclean spirit in him that will neither come out nor speak out, "What are you to do, sir, you inquire, during the vacation.
Vholes," returns the angry client. "You know as well as I that he would have strangled the suit if he could."
Vholes with the severity of a determined man, "when I ultimately congratulate you, sir, with all my heart, on your accession to fortune--which, but that I never give hopes, I might say something further about--you will owe me nothing beyond whatever little balance may be then outstanding of the costs as between solicitor and client not included in the taxed costs allowed out of the estate.
The client, with his dejection insensibly relieved and his vague hopes rekindled, takes pen and ink and writes the draft, not without perplexed consideration and calculation of the date it may bear, implying scant effects in the agent's hands.
A good riddance to me, whether as clerk or client! Well, Tony, that as I was mentioning is what they're up to."
Smalley, "between the risk of losing your client's business and the risk of losing Mine." Quite indefensible, I admit--an act of tyranny, and nothing less.
He smiled resignedly, and gave up the name of his client:
I have advised a prodigious number of clients, and have dealt with some exceedingly awkward difficulties, in my time.
"By the way," he said, "your clients in Cumberland have not heard anything more of the woman who wrote the anonymous letter, have they?"
Jaggers's own high-backed chair was of deadly black horse-hair, with rows of brass nails round it, like a coffin; and I fancied I could see how he leaned back in it, and bit his forefinger at the clients. The room was but small, and the clients seemed to have had a habit of backing up against the wall: the wall, especially opposite to Mr.
'All I know is,' said Miss Sally, smiling drily, for she delighted in nothing so much as irritating her brother, 'that if every one of your clients is to force us to keep a clerk, whether we want to or not, you had better leave off business, strike yourself off the roll, and get taken in execution, as soon as you can.'
If you think that it is in the best interests of your client that these letters should be placed in the hands of the Earl, then you would indeed be foolish to pay so large a sum of money to regain them..
And here I find you, a man of sense, boggling about terms, when your client's future and honour are at stake.
I must, therefore, abandon my client to her fate or I must play this last card.