clear (one's) throat

(redirected from clear their throats)

clear (one's) throat

1. Literally, to cough or make a guttural sound in an attempt to relieve a blockage in the throat, as is often caused by phlegm. I'm worried that I'm getting sick because I've had to clear my throat constantly all day long.
2. To make a coughing sound in order to attract attention. When the boss cleared her throat, we immediately stopped talking so that she could start the meeting.
See also: clear, throat
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

clear your ˈthroat

cough slightly, especially before speaking or to attract somebody’s attention: The lawyer stood up, cleared his throat and began to address the jury.
See also: clear, throat
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking may cause them to cough, clear their throats, or experience pain.
That is why many people clear their throats or try to loosen clothing around the neck when they are in a tense situation.
Store owners who rely upon such sales for revenue began to clear their throats. Editorial writers, including this page, warned of a new Prohibition.
He also said parents should ensure that their children clear their throats twice a day with lukewarm water to prevent infections.
Cigarette butts are dropped everywhere (even on the golf course) and it's shocking to see how people clear their throats and spit in the streets (I've seen some spitting a red liquid) and how taxi drivers open their doors to do same at traffic lights.
TB sufferers would cough blood or phlegm and spit to clear their throats. This was also when men used chewing tobacco and pubs had spittoons or troughs running the length of the bar.
But, equally, let's hope the more vociferous elements of the "Ashley out" brigade will recognise some of the positive steps taken before they next clear their throats to berate the club's ownership.
The fighter jets clear their throats before dropping
From today millions of England soccer fans must do their duty, clear their throats - and get singing.
But it is not taxpayers who should have to clear their throats - and foot the bill - for such an event.
Fine, highly commendable, and indeed he forged strong unifying links between each element of his all-French programme as one offering led to another - but where did this leave the audience, who, in all fairness, needed various gaps in which to shift positions and possibly clear their throats?