clay

(redirected from clayey)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

clay pigeon

A person who is easily exploited, deceived, or taken advantage of, especially due to being in a position of vulnerability. Likened to the clay pigeons (small clay discs) used as targets in trapshooting. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. He was used as a clay pigeon by the mafia, who laundered money through his accounts.
See also: clay, pigeon

potter's clay

A special type of clay that does not contain iron and is often used for making pottery. OK, class, make sure to get some potter's clay before you sit down at your wheel today.
See also: clay

feet of clay

A weakness or failing in someone. The phrase originated in the Bible. I know it's hard to believe, but anyone you admire surely has feet of clay.
See also: clay, feet, of

have feet of clay

To have a weakness or failing. The phrase originated in the Bible. I know it's hard to believe, but anyone you admire surely has feet of clay.
See also: clay, feet, have, of

have clay feet

To have a weakness or failing. The phrase originated in the Bible. I know it's hard to believe, but anyone you admire surely has clay feet.
See also: clay, feet, have

have feet of clay

Fig. [for a strong person] to have a defect of character. All human beings have feet of clay. No one is perfect. Sally was popular and successful. She was nearly fifty before she learned that she, too, had feet of clay.
See also: clay, feet, have, of

clay pigeon

A person easily duped or taken advantage of, as in You're a clay pigeon for all of those telephone fund-raisers. The term alludes to the clay pigeon of trapshooting, which replaced the use of live birds in this sport in the 1860s. Its transfer to figurative use in the first half of the 1900s probably is explained by the much older slang use of pigeon for "dupe." Also see fall guy.
See also: clay, pigeon

feet of clay

A failing or weakness in a person's character, as in The media are always looking for a popular idol's feet of clay. This expression comes from the Bible (Daniel 2:31-33), where the prophet interprets Nebuchadnezzar's dream of a statue with a head of gold and feet of iron clay. [c. 1600]
See also: clay, feet, of

have feet of clay

If someone who is admired or respected has feet of clay, they have serious faults or weaknesses which people generally do not know about. When those idols are found to have feet of clay the pain of disappointment can be profound. He's just another rock star with feet of clay. Note: You can also say that someone has clay feet. King writes endlessly about his subject's clay feet. Note: According to the Bible, King Nebuchadnezzar asked Daniel to explain his dream of a giant idol, which was made of gold, silver, brass, and iron, but had feet made partly from clay. Daniel told the king that the clay feet were a sign of weakness and vulnerability. (Daniel 2:33)
See also: clay, feet, have, of

have feet of clay

have a fatal flaw in a character that is otherwise powerful or admirable.
This expression alludes to the biblical account of a magnificent statue seen in a dream by Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon. It was constructed from fine metals, all except for its feet which were made of clay; when these were smashed, the whole statue was brought down and destroyed. Daniel interprets this to signify a future kingdom that will be ‘partly strong, and partly broken’, and will eventually fall (Daniel 2:31–5).
See also: clay, feet, have, of

feet of ˈclay

a surprising fault or weakness in the character of somebody who is admired and respected: Why are people always surprised when they discover that their heroes have feet of clay?This idiom comes from a story in the Bible, where the king of Babylon saw an image with a head of gold and feet of clay.
See also: clay, feet, of

clay

n. good-quality hashish. (Drugs.) Ask John where you can dig up some clay.

clay pigeon

n. a gullible person; a pigeon. (Underworld.) We need a clay pigeon to divert attention from the snatch.
See also: clay, pigeon

feet of clay

An underlying weakness or fault: "They discovered to their vast discomfiture that their idol had feet of clay, after placing him upon a pedestal" (James Joyce).
See also: clay, feet, of

feet of clay

A flaw or vulnerability of someone who is otherwise admirable. In the Bible's Book of Daniel, King Nebuchadnezzar dreamed that he saw a statue made of gold, silver, and brass, but with feet of clay. Daniel interpreted the vision to mean that the clay symbolized the Babylonian Empire's vulnerability and imminent collapse. (See Achilles' heel.)
See also: clay, feet, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Influence of water content on shear strength parameters of clayey soil in relation to stability analysis of a hillside in Brno region.
2] and clayey material rock content was calculated from chemical analyses, which was performed in the Institute of Geology and Geochemistry of Combustible Minerals of the NAS of Ukraine (Lviv, Ukraine).
The herbicides were more sorbed to the LVA, because it is a clayey soil with higher contents of organic matter and retention sites, and since the herbicides were less available in this soil, the residual effect was lower, leading to taller maize plants.
In addition, 10 samples of silty and clayey sands of the Utrillas facies were specifically taken from the stable bedrock out the landslide (former kaolin quarry at Navas del Pinar).
The pioneering experiment of Franco & Gallo (1976) tested high B doses in recently transplanted plants, grown in soils with clayey and sandy texture.
Similarly, it can make clayey soils more fertile by improving percolation and aeration.
Ten contributions discuss material characterization (effects of the maximum soil aggregates size and cyclic wetting-drying on the stiffness of a lime-treated clayey soil); experimental observations and modeling (water retention properties, hydromechanical behavior of compacted granular expansive mixtures); benchmarking of techniques and models; and applications to engineering problems and case studies.
Shadnia and Vafaeyan express that less porosity and high saturation degree are reasons of maximum oil penetration in clayey sand that are in good agreement with obtained results[16].
To ensure stability and consistency of subgrade, built of these soils, it is necessary to control a hydrothermal regime which is conditioned by the geofiltration properties of clayey soils.
For a record of older life and soils on Mars, Retallack said, new missions will be needed to explore older and more clayey terrains.
grey and light-brownish, sometimes dark fragments (humus tongues, roots, molhills); wetting, nutty, of high density, light-sticky, clayey, contains many wormholes and roots; living roots are few; the transition to the next horizon is gradual and level.
Therefore, on the surface (in the first 35-45 cm) they are slightly loose and permeable presenting a satisfactory drainage, and then it is significantly reduced as the texture becomes clayey, in level Bt they become compact and less permeable.