clay

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clay pigeon

A person who is easily exploited, deceived, or taken advantage of, especially due to being in a position of vulnerability. Likened to the clay pigeons (small clay discs) used as targets in trapshooting. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. He was used as a clay pigeon by the mafia, who laundered money through his accounts.
See also: clay, pigeon

clay up

1. To create a sculpture made of clay to be used as the model for a mold. A noun or pronoun can be used between "clay" and "up." I was working for a special effects studio for a while, and it was my job to clay up the various creatures and props before they were put into their silicone molds.
2. To cover a portion of a blade, especially its spine, with a clay or clay-like mixture before tempering the blade in a quenching liquid. A noun or pronoun can be used between "clay" and "up." It's important to clay your blade up before you begin the tempering process, or else your blade could end up cracking.
See also: clay, up

feet of clay

A weakness or failing in someone. The phrase originated in the Bible. I know it's hard to believe, but anyone you admire surely has feet of clay.
See also: clay, feet, of

have clay feet

To have a weakness or failing. The phrase originated in the Bible. I know it's hard to believe, but anyone you admire surely has clay feet.
See also: clay, feet, have

have feet of clay

To have a weakness or failing. The phrase originated in the Bible. I know it's hard to believe, but anyone you admire surely has feet of clay.
See also: clay, feet, have, of

potter's clay

A special type of clay that does not contain iron and is often used for making pottery. OK, class, make sure to get some potter's clay before you sit down at your wheel today.
See also: clay
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

have feet of clay

Fig. [for a strong person] to have a defect of character. All human beings have feet of clay. No one is perfect. Sally was popular and successful. She was nearly fifty before she learned that she, too, had feet of clay.
See also: clay, feet, have, of
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

clay pigeon

A person easily duped or taken advantage of, as in You're a clay pigeon for all of those telephone fund-raisers. The term alludes to the clay pigeon of trapshooting, which replaced the use of live birds in this sport in the 1860s. Its transfer to figurative use in the first half of the 1900s probably is explained by the much older slang use of pigeon for "dupe." Also see fall guy.
See also: clay, pigeon

feet of clay

A failing or weakness in a person's character, as in The media are always looking for a popular idol's feet of clay. This expression comes from the Bible (Daniel 2:31-33), where the prophet interprets Nebuchadnezzar's dream of a statue with a head of gold and feet of iron clay. [c. 1600]
See also: clay, feet, of
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

have feet of clay

If someone who is admired or respected has feet of clay, they have serious faults or weaknesses which people generally do not know about. When those idols are found to have feet of clay the pain of disappointment can be profound. He's just another rock star with feet of clay. Note: You can also say that someone has clay feet. King writes endlessly about his subject's clay feet. Note: According to the Bible, King Nebuchadnezzar asked Daniel to explain his dream of a giant idol, which was made of gold, silver, brass, and iron, but had feet made partly from clay. Daniel told the king that the clay feet were a sign of weakness and vulnerability. (Daniel 2:33)
See also: clay, feet, have, of
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

have feet of clay

have a fatal flaw in a character that is otherwise powerful or admirable.
This expression alludes to the biblical account of a magnificent statue seen in a dream by Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon. It was constructed from fine metals, all except for its feet which were made of clay; when these were smashed, the whole statue was brought down and destroyed. Daniel interprets this to signify a future kingdom that will be ‘partly strong, and partly broken’, and will eventually fall (Daniel 2:31–5).
See also: clay, feet, have, of
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

feet of ˈclay

a surprising fault or weakness in the character of somebody who is admired and respected: Why are people always surprised when they discover that their heroes have feet of clay?This idiom comes from a story in the Bible, where the king of Babylon saw an image with a head of gold and feet of clay.
See also: clay, feet, of
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

clay

n. good-quality hashish. (Drugs.) Ask John where you can dig up some clay.

clay pigeon

n. a gullible person; a pigeon. (Underworld.) We need a clay pigeon to divert attention from the snatch.
See also: clay, pigeon
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

feet of clay

An underlying weakness or fault: "They discovered to their vast discomfiture that their idol had feet of clay, after placing him upon a pedestal" (James Joyce).
See also: clay, feet, of
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

feet of clay, to have

A failing or fault in one who is held in high regard. The term comes from the Bible’s Book of Daniel (2:33), in which the prophet interprets King Nebuchadnezzar’s dream of an image of gold, silver, and brass, but “his feet part of iron and part of clay.” These feet were what made the image vulnerable and, according to Daniel, predicted the breakup of the empire.
See also: feet, have, of
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

feet of clay

A flaw or vulnerability of someone who is otherwise admirable. In the Bible's Book of Daniel, King Nebuchadnezzar dreamed that he saw a statue made of gold, silver, and brass, but with feet of clay. Daniel interpreted the vision to mean that the clay symbolized the Babylonian Empire's vulnerability and imminent collapse. (See Achilles' heel.)
See also: clay, feet, of
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in periodicals archive ?
5), typically consisting of a till overlying a coarser sequence of silty and clayey sand.
This study showed that in areas of the southeastern Coastal Plain with plinthite and clayey subsoils, where shallow lateral water movement is the dominant loss pathway, agrichemicals applied in the spring move laterally downslope during the rainy wet months and may take several seasons before completely leaving the upslope area and moving through the riparian forest.
The Heisler Mastodon Site began accumulating clayey and organic sediments as early as 14,800 years ago, immediately after glacial retreat from northeastern Calhoun County.
On Thursday, the company unveiled the 1,100 leakage cases concerning such data as the names, addresses, phone numbers, gender, e-mail addresses and details of orders of the customers who purchased the clayey silver material via the Internet after November 2001.
Confining pressure used in cyclic triaxial test is limited by 25 kPa, 50 kPa, and 100 kPa on reconstituted sample of clayey sand.
Clayey soils are more susceptible to shrinking and swelling with alternating drying and wetting cycles because of their ability to adsorb water and expand the small pore spaces between clay particles.
Finer material is also derived from the downfall of finely laminated clayey carbonaceous rocks.
Red clayey bands in dune sequences found in New South Wales and other parts of the world have similarly been interpreted as illuviated aeolian dust (e.g.
Inadequate air movement and root penetration are also a problem with clayey soils.
But while the clayey soil is great for topping off landfills and filling exhausted gravel quarries, it creates a few problems for the crews taking it out of the ground.
For this reason, only one sample area representing especially high buffer capacity was distinguished and was attached to widespread clayey plains type.
Water, flour and clayey products are the main products that are imported from Kosovo while the oil derivatives, cement and steely products are Macedonia's products exported to Kosovo.
Their topics include fundamental concepts in the mechanics and hydraulics of unsaturated geomaterials, the dessication cracking of soils, new experimental tools for characterizing highly over-consolidated clayey materials in unsaturated conditions, hydromechanical coupling theory in unsaturated geomaterials and its numerical integration, strain localization modeling in coupled transient phenomena, modeling landslides in partially saturated slopes subjected to rainfall infiltration, soil-pipeline interaction in unsaturated soils, and the geomechanical analysis of river embankments.
This calculated [k.sub.c] factor is significantly less than the CFEM recommended [k.sub.c] factor for clayey soil with qc = 1-5 MPa which is 0.35.