claim (something) for (oneself or something)

(redirected from claim for herself)

claim (something) for (oneself or something)

1. To declare something as one's property or jurisdiction. You can't have his potato chips—I already claimed them for myself! Do you think he might actually claim the throne for himself? After the battle, the victorious country claimed the contested area for itself.
2. To officially request money as repayment for damages. I can't believe he's claiming thousands of dollars for repairs when I barely dented his fender.
See also: claim

claim something for someone or something

to declare rights to or control of something for someone, or that something is the property of someone, a group, or a nation. The small country claimed the mountainous area for itself. Roger claimed all the rest of the ice cream for himself.
See also: claim

claim something for something

to make a claim for money in payment for damages. David claimed one thousand dollars for the damaged car. She claimed a lot of money for the amount of harm she experienced.
See also: claim
References in periodicals archive ?
Sanders, who had reserved the 93A claim for herself, then also found for the defendants, adopting the jury's findings as part of her own.
How does she claim for herself the authority to increase or originate, or invent or cause something, such as a book that people will read?
Briton's daughter Charlene Briton, 30, is also alleged to have submitted a further false food poisoning claim for herself and her young daughter for the holiday last year.
Briton's daughter Charlene Briton, 30, is alleged to have submitted a further false food poisoning claim for herself and her young daughter for the Spanish holiday last year.
It isn't true that part of what "really happened" was Eliza staking a historic claim for herself. To make his case, Domenech would have to show how, exactly, I misread the words, music, and dramatic action.
In 2004 he was clear in his mind that " if Sonia Gandhi had made any claim for herself I would have no option but to appoint her".
"Hers is the voice of a bold, gutsy, free-spirited woman who strikes out on her own journey to discover what's important to her mad to claim for herself what love, sex and romance mean to her sense of self.
Woods makes a strong case for Lanyer's groundbreaking importance as perhaps the first woman to claim for herself the authority to write original poems (rather than translations) and also her use of dedicatory poems in "the unapologetic creation of a community of good women for whom another woman is the spokesperson and commemorator" (xxxi).
What about all the people who are less like Herman Badillo and more like my grandmother, who dropped out of night school in 1921, bewildered by math class and ashamed of her imperfect English, and for the rest of her life felt unable to claim for herself the education she revered in others?