claim


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claim check

A ticket or receipt used to collect an item that has been deposited or is being held somewhere. Be sure to have your claim check ready or you will not be able to collect your car from the valet.
See also: check, claim

claim the moral high ground

To claim, purport, or make it appear that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are morally superior to those espoused by others. The senator always tries to claim the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: claim, ground, high, moral

take the moral high ground

To claim, purport, or make it appear that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are morally superior to those espoused by others. The senator always tries to take the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: ground, high, moral, take

seize the moral high ground

To claim, purport, or make it appear that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are morally superior to those espoused by others. The senator always tries to seize the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: ground, high, moral, seize

claim a/the/(one's) life

To result in one's death. This crime spree has already claimed the lives of 10 innocent people—when will the perpetrator be caught? That debilitating illness ultimately claimed her life.
See also: claim, life

claim (something) for (oneself or something)

1. To declare something as one's property or jurisdiction. You can't have his potato chips—I already claimed them for myself! Do you think he might actually claim the throne for himself? After the battle, the victorious country claimed the contested area for itself.
2. To officially request money as repayment for damages. I can't believe he's claiming thousands of dollars for repairs when I barely dented his fender.
See also: claim

claim to fame

The reason why someone or something is famous or well-known. I've heard that name before—what's his claim to fame? Jeff's big claim to fame is being on that reality show for one episode.
See also: claim, fame

stake a claim

To assert one's ownership of or right to something. My great-grandfather staked a claim to this land. You can't have this cookie because someone else already staked a claim to it.
See also: claim, stake

stake (one's) claim

To assert one's ownership of or right to something. John rushed to New York to stake his claim to his father's inheritance money.
See also: claim, stake

lay claim to (something)

To assert that one has the legal or proper right to own or possess something. If no one lays claim to the wallet within 48 hours, you'll be able to keep it for yourself. The youngest son is laying claim to the business now that their father has passed away.
See also: claim, lay

claim a life

Fig. [for something] to take the life of someone. The killer tornado claimed the lives of six people at the trailer park. The athlete's life was claimed in a skiing accident.
See also: claim, life

claim something for someone or something

to declare rights to or control of something for someone, or that something is the property of someone, a group, or a nation. The small country claimed the mountainous area for itself. Roger claimed all the rest of the ice cream for himself.
See also: claim

claim something for something

to make a claim for money in payment for damages. David claimed one thousand dollars for the damaged car. She claimed a lot of money for the amount of harm she experienced.
See also: claim

equate

someone to someone else and equate something to something else to claim that someone is in some manner the same as someone else; to claim that something is in some manner the same as something else. I would equate Tom to Wallywhen it comes to native ability. You cannot equate my car to that jalopy you drive!

lay claim to something

to place a claim on something. Do you really think you can lay claim to that money after all these years? Someone came by and laid claim to the wallet you found.
See also: claim, lay

someone's claim to fame

someone's reason for being well-known or famous. Her claim to fame is that she can recite the entire works of Shakespeare.
See also: claim, fame

stake a claim to someone or something

Fig. to state or record one's claim on someone or something. (Alludes to marking off an area by pounding in wooden stakes.) she staked a claim to Jeff and told all her rivals to stay away. The prospector staked a claim to the gold-rich area.
See also: claim, stake

stake out a claim to something

 and stake out a claim on something
to lay claim to something. The prospector staked out a claim to the promising piece of land. We staked out a claim on two seats at the side of the auditorium.
See also: claim, out, stake

claim check

A receipt for property that has been left or deposited, as in Give me your claim check and I'll pick up your laundry for you. This term most often refers to a receipt for such items as laundry (left for washing), clothes (for dry cleaning), a car (for servicing), or baggage (for short-term storage). [First half of 1900s]
See also: check, claim

lay claim to

Assert one's right to or ownership of, as in "What claim lays she to thee?" (Shakespeare, The Comedy of Errors, 3:2). [Late 1500s] Also see stake a claim.
See also: claim, lay

stake a claim

Also, stake out a claim. Indicate something as one's own, as in I'm staking a claim to the drumstick, or She staked out a claim for herself in the insurance business. This term, dating from the mid-1800s, originally meant "register a claim to land by marking it with stakes." It was being used figuratively by the late 1800s.
See also: claim, stake

a claim to fame

COMMON A person or place's claim to fame is something quite important or interesting that they have done or that is connected with them. Barbara Follett's greatest claim to fame is that she taught Labour MPs how to look good on television. The town's ancient castle was its main claim to fame.
See also: claim, fame

claim to fame

a reason for being regarded as unusual or noteworthy (often used when the reason cited is comical, bizarre, or trivial).
See also: claim, fame

stake a claim

declare your right to something.
This expression refers to the practice of putting stakes around the perimeter of a piece of land to which a claim is laid. It is American in origin, dating from the California gold rush of 1849 , when the prospectors registered their claims to individual plots of land in this way.
See also: claim, stake

ˌclaim to ˈfame

(often humorous) one thing that makes a person or place important or interesting: His main claim to fame is that he went to school with the President.
See also: claim, fame

lay ˈclaim to something

state that you have a right to something: ‘The Lamb and Flag’ lays claim to being the oldest pub in London.
See also: claim, lay, something

take, claim, seize, etc. the moral ˈhigh ground

claim that your side of an argument is morally better than your opponents’ side; argue in a way that makes your side seem morally better: Don’t you try to take the moral high ground with me! You’re just as bad as I am!
See also: ground, high, moral

stake (out) a/your ˈclaim to somebody/something

say that you have a special interest in somebody/something, or have a right to own something, especially to warn other people not to take it: Both countries have staked out a claim to the land.If you staked out your claim to some land, you put stakes (= wooden posts) in the ground to mark the limits of land that you claimed was yours.

lay claim to

To assert one's right to or ownership of.
See also: claim, lay
References in periodicals archive ?
Accenture research indicates that insurers have three main concerns about claims business-process outsourcing: disruption of customer relationships that may occur when a critical process moves to a third party; immaturity of the business-process outsourcing provider landscape-most outsourcers are ill-equipped to deliver on severity management or service uplift, and focus almost exclusively on labor cost arbitrage; and finally, regulatory and political restraints on outsourcing, particularly offshore.
Disregarding any insurance implications, an example of such a claim would be a situation where a defective barbeque grill causes a home to catch fire.
However, GCM 38786 also contemplates the filing of protective claims when expiration of the refund SOL is imminent and the taxpayer is unable either to submit the supporting statements required by the regulations or to precisely quantify the claim (i.
Remember that the consultant reviewing the claim does not have the benefit of being able to see the patient clinically," says Ms.
Deductibles may apply to each claim and certain coverage may be limited.
The audit is an interactive process and the vast majority of most taxpayers make every effort to file their claims as soon as possible.
This eliminates the paper adjustment, which could take several months to process, and allows the facility to bill the corrected claim the same day as the reversal.
Calcium helps prevent osteoporosis" is a health claim, because it mentions a disease.
Health plans can predict the numbers of office visits, consultations, hospitalizations, immunizations, and other services by a primary care physician and use their databases of claims to ascertain which physicians are ordering fewer services than expected.
Often, Sick Building Syndrome claims stem from activities which took place many years ago.
The measures must include investigating every possible reason a workers' compensation claim is filed and developing strategies to forestall unnecessary claims.
It is, in fact, not too unusual to find L&I asking for second, third, or more opinions on the same claim, and counting each one al a separate referral and/or separate closure.
With ClaimCenter, RGS's claims organization will gain a modern technology foundation with which to transform its claim processes and deliver enhanced service to its policyholders.
It is fully integrated with all mission-critical claim systems, thus eliminating double data entries, and also was designed for self service.