circumstance

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Related to circumstances: unforeseen circumstances
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circumstances alter cases

Unique circumstances can spur unconventional action. I know offering such a big refund isn't protocol, but it's for the CEO's grandmother, and circumstances alter cases.
See also: alter, case, circumstance

comfortable circumstances

The state of having enough money to live well. We used to have barely enough money to pay rent, but ever since Pat got that promotion, we've been living in comfortable circumstances.

extenuating circumstances

A non-specific reason that excuses something that would otherwise be troublesome or problematic. All I heard was that the professor gave her an extension on her term paper due to extenuating circumstances.
See also: circumstance

force of circumstance

A situation over which one has little or no control and is thus forced to take certain actions. Don't tell me that you started drinking as a force of circumstance—there are plenty of other choices you could have made.
See also: circumstance, force, of

in no circumstances

Never; in no case or situation; irrespective of events or conditions. In no circumstances are you allowed to drive home after you've had more than one drink! I'm sorry for my sudden resignation, but in no circumstances will I work for some sexist manager like him.
See also: circumstance, no

in reduced circumstances

At a much lower level of income or financial means. The one-time business tycoon has now been living in reduced circumstances in a small village in Norway.
See also: circumstance, reduce

in the circumstances

Due to the conditions or particular situation; such as the case is. Of course we wish that we could pay each employee a proper Christmas bonus, but in the circumstances, that is just not feasible. I'm sorry for my sudden resignation, but I'm afraid that, in the circumstances, I just can't work here any longer.
See also: circumstance

not under any circumstance(s)

At no time; never; for no reason whatsoever. No child of mine is going to become a lawyer—not under any circumstances! A: "Would you ever consider joining one of our committees in the future?" B: "No, not under any circumstance." Fans are not allowed backstage under any circumstances!
See also: any, not

pomp and circumstance

Celebration accompanied by traditional formalities and ceremony. Please, there's no need for all this pomp and circumstance. I'm just an ordinary guest who has come to enjoy the performance like everyone else. In the wake of the tragedy, the Queen's trip was not accompanied by the usual pomp and circumstance.
See also: and, circumstance, pomp

reduced circumstances

A much lower level of income or financial means than one is used to. The one-time business tycoon has now been living in reduced circumstances in a small village in Norway. Our reduced circumstances have meant moving into a much smaller house in a rougher part of town.
See also: circumstance, reduce

under certain circumstances

In certain situations. I let my kids sleep with me in my bedroom under certain circumstance, like if they've had a nightmare.

under no circumstances

At no time; never. Under no circumstances will I allow you to go to a party on a school night.
See also: circumstance, no

under normal circumstances

According to the way things normally happen, occur, or unfold. Under normal circumstances, applications should take two to three weeks to process, but we are experiencing an unusually high volume of applicants at the moment. I'd usually start with recommending a change in diet and lifestyle under normal circumstances, but considering how severe the condition is I think we need to look at more drastic treatment options.
See also: circumstance, normal

under the circumstances

In consideration of what is currently happening. Under the circumstances, I think you should rest—you are just getting over a cold, after all. Under the circumstances, I think we could consider ourselves lucky—it could have been a lot worse.
See also: circumstance

Circumstances alter cases.

Prov. In unusual situations, people are allowed to do unusual things. Cashier: I'm sorry, this store does not accept personal checks. Customer: But I need this medicine, and I don't have any cash. I've shopped at this store for fifteen years. Surely you can trust me this once. Cashier: Well, all right. Circumstances alter cases.
See also: alter, case, Circumstance

extenuating circumstances

special (but otherwise unspecified) circumstances that account for an irregular or improper way of doing something. Mary was permitted to arrive late because of extenuating circumstances. Due to extenuating circumstances, the teacher will not meet with the class today.
See also: circumstance

in reduced circumstances

Euph. in poverty. After Frederick lost his position, we lived in reduced circumstances while waiting for my inheritance.
See also: circumstance, reduce

under certain circumstances

 and under certain conditions
Fig. depending on or influenced by something; because of something. Under certain conditions, you can see across the lake to the other side. Under certain circumstances, what you propose to do is all right.

under no circumstances

 and not under any circumstances
Fig. absolutely never. Andy: Under no circumstances will I ever go back there again! Rachel: Why? What happened? Sue: Can I talk you into serving as a referee again? Mary: Heavens, no! Not under any circumstances!
See also: circumstance, no

under normal circumstances

Fig. normally; usually; typically. "We'd be able to keep the dog at home under normal circumstances," said Mary to the vet. "Under normal circumstances you'd be able to return to work in a week," explained the doctor.
See also: circumstance, normal

under the circumstances

Fig. in a particular situation; because of the circumstances. I'm sorry to hear that you're ill. Under the circumstances, you may take the day off. We won't expect you to come to work for a few days, under the circumstances.
See also: circumstance

extenuating circumstances

A situation or condition that provides an excuse for an action, as in Although Nancy missed three crucial rehearsals, there were extenuating circumstances, so she was not dismissed . This expression was originally legal terminology, denoting circumstances that partly excuse a crime and therefore call for less punishment or damages. [c. 1600]
See also: circumstance

under any circumstances

Also, under no circumstances. See under the circumstances.
See also: any, circumstance

under the circumstances

Also, in the circumstances. Given these conditions, such being the case, as in Under the circumstances we can't leave Mary out. This idiom uses circumstance in the sense of "a particular situation," a usage dating from the late 1300s. It may also be modified in various ways, such as under any circumstances meaning "no matter what the situation," as in We'll phone her under any circumstances; under no circumstances, meaning "in no case, never," as in Under no circumstances may you smoke; under any other circumstances, meaning "in a different situation," as in I can't work under any other circumstances; and under the same circumstances, meaning "given the same situation," as in Under the same circumstances anyone would have done the same.
See also: circumstance

pomp and circumstance

the ceremonial formality surrounding a public event.
The expression originates in Shakespeare's Othello: ‘Farewell…the royal banner, and all quality, pride, pomp, and circumstance of glorious war’; but its modern currency owes much to its use as the title of a set of orchestral marches ( 1901 ) by Sir Edward Elgar .
See also: and, circumstance, pomp

in reduced circumstances

used euphemistically to refer to the state of being poor after being relatively wealthy.
See also: circumstance, reduce

in/under the ˈcircumstances

used before or after a statement to show that you have thought about the conditions that affect a situation before making a decision or a statement: Under the circumstances, it seemed better not to tell him about the accident.She did the job very well in the circumstances.
See also: circumstance

in/under no circumstances

used to emphasize that something should never happen or be allowed: Under no circumstances should you lend Paul any money.Don’t open the door to strangers in any circumstances.
See also: circumstance, no

force of ˈcircumstance

a situation in which you are forced to do something by factors beyond your control: He claimed he turned to crime through force of circumstance. He hadn’t been able to find a job and his family was starving.
See also: circumstance, force, of

pomp and ˈcircumstance

formal and impressive ceremony: The Prince was welcomed with warmth, but not with all the pomp and circumstance he was used to.This comes from Shakespeare’s play Othello and refers to the impressive clothes, decorations, music, etc. that are part of an official ceremony.
See also: and, circumstance, pomp

reˌduced ˈcircumstances

the state of being poorer than you were before. People say ‘living in reduced circumstances’ to avoid saying ‘poor’: As time passed, his reduced circumstances became more and more obvious to his friends and colleagues.
See also: circumstance, reduce

under no circumstances

In no case; never.
See also: circumstance, no
References in periodicals archive ?
"We also provide guidance for the judge on remand with regard to the special circumstances analysis.
The proposal sought to change the conditions for martial law, from just "circumstances in which war is imminent" to "circumstances in which threats of war are significantly heightened." The proposal intended to "add flexibility to circumstances in which the martial law is imposed."
Baquba / NINA/ - The dead body of a security element was found who was killed in mysterious circumstances northeast of Baquba.
Summary: New Delhi [India], November 23 (ANI): The reservation limit in Gujarat can exceed 50 percent only if the government can show that exceptional circumstances exist, constitutional expert Suraj Singh said on Wednesday.
This mantra is used in answer to voices of protest when someone is killed by police under suspicious circumstances, such as when an arrested suspect is killed inside a police car for allegedly attempting to grab an officer's gun.
CARDIFF University is currently considering a change in its "extenuating circumstances" policy after a student petition was launched calling for a specific sexual assault clause to be added to its code of conduct.
In other words when you go past self-identification to the question of what conditions people believe abortion should be legal in, you find that a majority say abortion "should be illegal in all circumstances" (19%) or legal "in only a few circumstances" (36%)-a total of 55%.
I BELIEVE that Middlesbrough Council are not playing fair with residents who lose their wheelie bin - in certain circumstances.
Your circumstances can have a great influence over the person you become, but that does not mean they determine who you are.
After listing 10 crucial circumstances to prove the involvement of the parents, the agency has stated in its closure report that there were a number of critical and serious gaps in the circumstances, which made it difficult to string together the sequence of events and the motive behind the murder.
Wade ruling gave sweeping constitutional protection to abortion -- asks Americans to say whether they believe abortion should be "legal under any circumstances," "legal only under certain circumstances," or "illegal in all circumstances." The current analysis is based on Gallup trends grouped into six time periods between 1975 and 2009.
THE financial circumstances of North West households have suffered most from recession - that is the claim in an Institute of Financial Planning poll, as part of Financial Planning Week.
Technical problems, the Court held, do not in themselves constitute extraordinary circumstances' justifying non-payment of the compensation required by Regulation 261/2004 on air passengers' rights.