circumstance


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Related to circumstance: Pomp and Circumstance

in the circumstances

Due to the conditions or particular situation; such as the case is. Of course we wish that we could pay each employee a proper Christmas bonus, but in the circumstances, that is just not feasible. I'm sorry for my sudden resignation, but I'm afraid that, in the circumstances, I just can't work here any longer.
See also: circumstance

in no circumstances

Never; in no case or situation; irrespective of events or conditions. In no circumstances are you allowed to drive home after you've had more than one drink! I'm sorry for my sudden resignation, but in no circumstances will I work for some sexist manager like him.
See also: circumstance, no

comfortable circumstances

The state of having enough money to live well. We used to have barely enough money to pay rent, but ever since Pat got that promotion, we've been living in comfortable circumstances.

circumstances alter cases

Unique circumstances can spur unconventional action. I know offering such a big refund isn't protocol, but it's for the CEO's grandmother, and circumstances alter cases.
See also: alter, case, circumstance

pomp and circumstance

Celebration accompanied by traditional formalities and ceremony. Please, there's no need for all this pomp and circumstance. I'm just an ordinary guest who has come to enjoy the performance like everyone else. In the wake of the tragedy, the Queen's trip was not accompanied by the usual pomp and circumstance.
See also: and, circumstance, pomp

in reduced circumstances

At a much lower level of income or financial means. The one-time business tycoon has now been living in reduced circumstances in a small village in Norway.
See also: circumstance, reduce

under certain circumstances

In certain situations. I let my kids sleep with me in my bedroom under certain circumstance, like if they've had a nightmare.

under no circumstances

At no time; never. Under no circumstances will I allow you to go to a party on a school night.
See also: circumstance, no

under the circumstances

In consideration of what is currently happening. Under the circumstances, I think you should rest—you are just getting over a cold, after all. Under the circumstances, I think we could consider ourselves lucky—it could have been a lot worse.
See also: circumstance

force of circumstance

A situation over which one has little or no control and is thus forced to take certain actions. Don't tell me that you started drinking as a force of circumstance—there are plenty of other choices you could have made.
See also: circumstance, force, of

reduced circumstances

A much lower level of income or financial means than one is used to. The one-time business tycoon has now been living in reduced circumstances in a small village in Norway. Our reduced circumstances have meant moving into a much smaller house in a rougher part of town.
See also: circumstance, reduce

extenuating circumstances

A non-specific reason that excuses something that would otherwise be troublesome or problematic. All I heard was that the professor gave her an extension on her term paper due to extenuating circumstances.
See also: circumstance

not under any circumstance(s)

At no time; never; for no reason whatsoever. No child of mine is going to become a lawyer—not under any circumstances! A: "Would you ever consider joining one of our committees in the future?" B: "No, not under any circumstance."
See also: any, not

Circumstances alter cases.

Prov. In unusual situations, people are allowed to do unusual things. Cashier: I'm sorry, this store does not accept personal checks. Customer: But I need this medicine, and I don't have any cash. I've shopped at this store for fifteen years. Surely you can trust me this once. Cashier: Well, all right. Circumstances alter cases.
See also: alter, case, Circumstance

extenuating circumstances

special (but otherwise unspecified) circumstances that account for an irregular or improper way of doing something. Mary was permitted to arrive late because of extenuating circumstances. Due to extenuating circumstances, the teacher will not meet with the class today.
See also: circumstance

in reduced circumstances

Euph. in poverty. After Frederick lost his position, we lived in reduced circumstances while waiting for my inheritance.
See also: circumstance, reduce

under certain circumstances

 and under certain conditions
Fig. depending on or influenced by something; because of something. Under certain conditions, you can see across the lake to the other side. Under certain circumstances, what you propose to do is all right.

under no circumstances

 and not under any circumstances
Fig. absolutely never. Andy: Under no circumstances will I ever go back there again! Rachel: Why? What happened? Sue: Can I talk you into serving as a referee again? Mary: Heavens, no! Not under any circumstances!
See also: circumstance, no

under normal circumstances

Fig. normally; usually; typically. "We'd be able to keep the dog at home under normal circumstances," said Mary to the vet. "Under normal circumstances you'd be able to return to work in a week," explained the doctor.
See also: circumstance, normal

under the circumstances

Fig. in a particular situation; because of the circumstances. I'm sorry to hear that you're ill. Under the circumstances, you may take the day off. We won't expect you to come to work for a few days, under the circumstances.
See also: circumstance

extenuating circumstances

A situation or condition that provides an excuse for an action, as in Although Nancy missed three crucial rehearsals, there were extenuating circumstances, so she was not dismissed . This expression was originally legal terminology, denoting circumstances that partly excuse a crime and therefore call for less punishment or damages. [c. 1600]
See also: circumstance

under any circumstances

Also, under no circumstances. See under the circumstances.
See also: any, circumstance

under the circumstances

Also, in the circumstances. Given these conditions, such being the case, as in Under the circumstances we can't leave Mary out. This idiom uses circumstance in the sense of "a particular situation," a usage dating from the late 1300s. It may also be modified in various ways, such as under any circumstances meaning "no matter what the situation," as in We'll phone her under any circumstances; under no circumstances, meaning "in no case, never," as in Under no circumstances may you smoke; under any other circumstances, meaning "in a different situation," as in I can't work under any other circumstances; and under the same circumstances, meaning "given the same situation," as in Under the same circumstances anyone would have done the same.
See also: circumstance

pomp and circumstance

the ceremonial formality surrounding a public event.
The expression originates in Shakespeare's Othello: ‘Farewell…the royal banner, and all quality, pride, pomp, and circumstance of glorious war’; but its modern currency owes much to its use as the title of a set of orchestral marches ( 1901 ) by Sir Edward Elgar .
See also: and, circumstance, pomp

in reduced circumstances

used euphemistically to refer to the state of being poor after being relatively wealthy.
See also: circumstance, reduce

in/under the ˈcircumstances

used before or after a statement to show that you have thought about the conditions that affect a situation before making a decision or a statement: Under the circumstances, it seemed better not to tell him about the accident.She did the job very well in the circumstances.
See also: circumstance

in/under no circumstances

used to emphasize that something should never happen or be allowed: Under no circumstances should you lend Paul any money.Don’t open the door to strangers in any circumstances.
See also: circumstance, no

force of ˈcircumstance

a situation in which you are forced to do something by factors beyond your control: He claimed he turned to crime through force of circumstance. He hadn’t been able to find a job and his family was starving.
See also: circumstance, force, of

pomp and ˈcircumstance

formal and impressive ceremony: The Prince was welcomed with warmth, but not with all the pomp and circumstance he was used to.This comes from Shakespeare’s play Othello and refers to the impressive clothes, decorations, music, etc. that are part of an official ceremony.
See also: and, circumstance, pomp

reˌduced ˈcircumstances

the state of being poorer than you were before. People say ‘living in reduced circumstances’ to avoid saying ‘poor’: As time passed, his reduced circumstances became more and more obvious to his friends and colleagues.
See also: circumstance, reduce

under no circumstances

In no case; never.
See also: circumstance, no
References in periodicals archive ?
The existence of special circumstances does not automatically result in prejudice.
The high court found that Dangupon's claimed justifying circumstance of self-defense was contradicted by evidence that Aguilar had voluntarily surrendered, was handcuffed, and could not have grabbed the grenade.
"We feel specific wording needs to be added to ensure that there is no confusion in the future, and that there is more clarity on circumstances surrounding sexual assault."
Moreover, as Tobias told Greenhouse, almost a quarter of those who self-identified as "pro-choice" [23%] picked that same category-"legal in only a few circumstances"!
An aggravating circumstance must be established beyond a reasonable doubt before it may be considered by you in arriving at your recommendation.
A related tool for assessing the pay-for-performance link is an economic impact analysis, often dubbed the "Tally Sheet on Steroids." While a regular tally sheet looks at termination payouts under various circumstances, the more extensive analysis examines the range of payouts possible under multiple performance scenarios.
To be valid, a notice of circumstances must provide the information called for by the policy.
Board Enforcement Counsel filed a response to Peyrelevade's Request for Interlocutory Review, arguing that the Board has previously denied an almost identical request for interlocutory review in an earlier enforcement action and that Peyrelevade has failed to satisfy any of the elements necessary for the Board to find that the circumstances "are extraordinary enough" to merit interlocutory review.
Mired in this "web of circumstance," Ben seeks revenge on Colonel Thornton, whom he mistakenly believes to be guilty of framing him.
The most compelling part of Elders's life is her childhood of rural poverty, and her overcoming that to rise to a position in Arkansas to help those in similar circumstances. How to help people out of poverty has perplexed and occupied this nation for many years.
In holding that Georgia's "wantonly vile" aggravating circumstance was not necessarily unconstitutionally vague, the Court agreed with the petitioner that any murder might involve depravity of mind or an aggravated battery.(18) However, the Court found that the language in question would not necessarily be construed in so broad a fashion by Georgia courts and that there was no reason to assume that the Georgia Supreme Court would adopt such an open-ended definition.(19) Thus, in Gregg, the Court indicated that if a state's sentencing scheme, on its face, did not sufficiently channel a sentencer's discretion, the state's courts could adopt a narrowing construction and therefore "save" the statute.(20)
It states that where the requirement, qualification or factor on which there was some distinction in treatment was reasonable and bona fide under the circumstances, there was no discrimination.
This shows that discussions on mobilizing forces under such circumstances had continued throughout the rule of conservative administrations from 2008 to 2016.
Baquba / NINA/ - The dead body of a security element was found who was killed in mysterious circumstances northeast of Baquba.
Summary: New Delhi [India], November 23 (ANI): The reservation limit in Gujarat can exceed 50 percent only if the government can show that exceptional circumstances exist, constitutional expert Suraj Singh said on Wednesday.