cinch

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Related to cinching: saddling

cinch

1. verb To be definitively resolved. I think offering him more vacation days could cinch the deal here.
2. noun A very easy task. Getting here was a cinch because there was no traffic at all.

cinch up

To make something tighter, often by pulling the strap or string on something. If your sweatpants are falling down, try cinching up the drawstring.
See also: cinch, up

dead cinch

A very easy task. Getting here was a dead cinch because there was no traffic at all.
See also: cinch, dead

have (got) (something) cinched

To definitively resolve a particular situation. I think we've got this contract cinched now—offering him more vacation days really helped.
See also: cinch, have

have (something) cinched

To have the definitive solution to a particular problem situation. I think you could have this contract cinched here if you just offer him more vacation days.
See also: cinch, have

it's a cinch

It is a very easy task. It's a cinch to get to work at this early hour—hardly anyone is on the road yet.
See also: cinch

lead-pipe cinch

A task that is easily, effortlessly, or certain to be accomplished. I've been running marathons for years now, so this 5K run will be a lead-pipe cinch for me. Everyone assumed her election would be a lead-pipe cinch, so it shocked the entire nation when she lost.
See also: cinch
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

have something cinched

Fig. Inf. to have something settled; to have the results of some act assured. Don't worry. I've got it cinched. You just think you've got it cinched.
See also: cinch, have

It's a (dead) cinch.

Fig. It's a very easy task. (Dead means absolutely.) Tom: Did you figure out how to change the tire? Jane: Yep! It was a cinch. Altering clothes patterns is difficult for me, but for Mary, it's a dead cinch.
See also: cinch

lead-pipe cinch

Fig. something very easy to do; something entirely certain to happen. I knew it was a lead-pie cinch that I would be selected to head the publication committee.
See also: cinch
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lead-pipe cinch

A certainty, an assured success. For example, "An engagement ain't always a lead-pipe cinch" (O. Henry, The Sphinx Apple, 1907). This colloquial expression is of disputed origin. It may allude to the cinch that tightly holds a horse's saddle in place, which can make it easier for the rider to succeed in a race; or it may allude to a cinch in plumbing, in which a lead pipe is fastened with a band of steel to another pipe or a fixture, making a very secure joint. [Late 1800s]
See also: cinch
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cinch up

v.
To tighten some drawstring or strap, especially a saddle girth: I cinched up the saddle girth before mounting the horse. I cinched up the hood of my jacket to keep the rain out.
See also: cinch, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cinch

(sɪntʃ)
1. n. something very easy. No sweat! It was a cinch!
2. tv. to have something settled and secured. It only took a handshake to cinch the deal.

cinched

(sɪntʃt)
mod. settled; secured; sealed (up). (As one tightens the saddle girth on a horse.) I’ve got it cinched! No sweat!
See also: cinch

dead cinch

n. an absolute certainty; an easy thing to do. It’s a dead cinch. I foresee no problems.
See also: cinch, dead

have something cinched

tv. to have something settled; to have the results of some act assured. (see also cinched. Have got can replace have.) You just think you’ve got it cinched.
See also: cinch, have, something
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

lead-pipe cinch

An absolute certainty; an easy success. Unlike the meaning of this cliché, the etymology is uncertain. It originated in America in the late nineteenth century and may refer to (l) the cinch that holds a horse’s saddle in place, which, if well fastened, makes it easier for the rider to win a race; or (2), more likely, to plumbing, where a lead pipe is fastened with a steel band to another pipe or fixture, making for a very secure joint. O. Henry used the term in a short story published in 1907 (The Sphinx Apple): “An engagement ain’t always a lead-pipe cinch.”
See also: cinch
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
I initially evaluated breaking strengths of the cinch stop breakaway (CSB) mechanism in the laboratory by measuring the breaking force by cinching down CSB snares until the mechanism released on a front leg collected from a female moose (circumference = 22.7 cm) and a simulated wolf neck (i.e., 27.9 cm circumference steel pipe wrapped with cotton; Phillips et al.
A three-position molded nylon clamp locks a cinching rope, which goes around the entire net.
When exposed to UV light of a certain wavelength, these molecules link, cinching the polymer's own constituent chains in place.
It is likely that the younger Norry was already in ill health." Monsieur Norry looks bored with it all - existence, nonexistence, his cravat, the button cinching his jacket, Ingres and his busy silence - but what is seen is less a portrait of Charles Desire Norry than that of a mind forever moving elsewhere.
USES: A quick and easy-tying knot for cinching closed bunches and bundles of stuff or closing trash bags or anyplace where you need a fight, hard-to-remove knot that won't loosen.