cinch


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cinch

1. verb To be definitively resolved. I think offering him more vacation days could cinch the deal here.
2. noun A very easy task. Getting here was a cinch because there was no traffic at all.

cinch up

To make something tighter, often by pulling the strap or string on something. If your sweatpants are falling down, try cinching up the drawstring.
See also: cinch, up

lead-pipe cinch

A task that is easily, effortlessly, or certain to be accomplished. I've been running marathons for years now, so this 5K run will be a lead-pipe cinch for me. Everyone assumed her election would be a lead-pipe cinch, so it shocked the entire nation when she lost.
See also: cinch

dead cinch

A very easy task. Getting here was a dead cinch because there was no traffic at all.
See also: cinch, dead

have something cinched

Fig. Inf. to have something settled; to have the results of some act assured. Don't worry. I've got it cinched. You just think you've got it cinched.
See also: cinch, have

It's a (dead) cinch.

Fig. It's a very easy task. (Dead means absolutely.) Tom: Did you figure out how to change the tire? Jane: Yep! It was a cinch. Altering clothes patterns is difficult for me, but for Mary, it's a dead cinch.
See also: cinch

lead-pipe cinch

Fig. something very easy to do; something entirely certain to happen. I knew it was a lead-pie cinch that I would be selected to head the publication committee.
See also: cinch

lead-pipe cinch

A certainty, an assured success. For example, "An engagement ain't always a lead-pipe cinch" (O. Henry, The Sphinx Apple, 1907). This colloquial expression is of disputed origin. It may allude to the cinch that tightly holds a horse's saddle in place, which can make it easier for the rider to succeed in a race; or it may allude to a cinch in plumbing, in which a lead pipe is fastened with a band of steel to another pipe or a fixture, making a very secure joint. [Late 1800s]
See also: cinch

cinch up

v.
To tighten some drawstring or strap, especially a saddle girth: I cinched up the saddle girth before mounting the horse. I cinched up the hood of my jacket to keep the rain out.
See also: cinch, up

cinch

(sɪntʃ)
1. n. something very easy. No sweat! It was a cinch!
2. tv. to have something settled and secured. It only took a handshake to cinch the deal.

cinched

(sɪntʃt)
mod. settled; secured; sealed (up). (As one tightens the saddle girth on a horse.) I’ve got it cinched! No sweat!
See also: cinch

dead cinch

n. an absolute certainty; an easy thing to do. It’s a dead cinch. I foresee no problems.
See also: cinch, dead

have something cinched

tv. to have something settled; to have the results of some act assured. (see also cinched. Have got can replace have.) You just think you’ve got it cinched.
See also: cinch, have, something

lead-pipe cinch

An absolute certainty; an easy success. Unlike the meaning of this cliché, the etymology is uncertain. It originated in America in the late nineteenth century and may refer to (l) the cinch that holds a horse’s saddle in place, which, if well fastened, makes it easier for the rider to win a race; or (2), more likely, to plumbing, where a lead pipe is fastened with a steel band to another pipe or fixture, making for a very secure joint. O. Henry used the term in a short story published in 1907 (The Sphinx Apple): “An engagement ain’t always a lead-pipe cinch.”
See also: cinch
References in periodicals archive ?
Not using a cinch stop can be problematic if the breakaway mechanism does not release the moose because the chance of injury and even death is high due to freezing limbs.
Since last year, Xavier's high school science teachers and students have been using McGraw-Hill's Cinch Learning, an online learning management system widely used in the United States.
Three years ago, Kenneth Norris and Bertel Mohl suggested that toothed whales -- a suborder that includes bottle-nosed dolphins and killer whales -- might use bursts of intense sonar to stun elusive prey, making food gathering a cinch.