churn

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churn out

To produce something in large quantities, often quickly and/or carelessly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "churn" and "out." That novelist seems to churn out a new bestseller every few months. I want to open a fine dining restaurant, not just some place that churns out burgers and fries.
See also: churn, out

churn up

To cause the movement of something in a liquid (such as sediment of some kind) by stirring. A noun or pronoun can be used between "churn" and "up." I stirred the milk and churned up bits of chocolate powder that had settled to the bottom of the glass. Because we're so close to the shore, your oars will likely churn some pebbles up.
See also: churn, up

churn something out

to produce something in large numbers, perhaps carelessly. We churn toys out by the thousand. This factory can churn out these parts day and night.
See also: churn, out

churn something up

to stir up a liquid; to mix up material suspended in water. The oars of our boat churned the shallow water up, leaving little clouds of sediment in our wake. The oars churned up the mud.
See also: churn, up

churn out

Produce in an abundant and automatic manner, as in He churned out a novel every six months. This idiom transfers the turning of milk into butter to other kinds of production. [Early 1900s]
See also: churn, out

churn out

v.
To produce something in an abundant and automatic manner: The author churns out four novels a year. Although the chairs look handmade, the company churns them out in a factory.
See also: churn, out

churn

tv. [for a stockbroker] to cause a heavy turnover in the portfolio of an investor. (The broker collects commissions on each transaction.) I reported my broker for churning my account.
References in periodicals archive ?
For more intimation about individual Dazey churns: Doug & Linda's Dairy Antique site at http://dairyantiques.com/Dazey_Butter_Churns.html.
Information is sketchy, but apparently he began to make can openers and probably other kitchenware items and became interested in a glass jar churn developed by E.B.
Dazey improved the Inoes churn with different paddles and in May 1906 applied for a patent on a "new and useful" churn.
Even a child can churn cream into butter, which is why butter making is a common activity in kindergartens.
A churn is anything that can agitate cream until the butterfat comes out of suspension, resulting in butter and buttermilk.
Butter churned from long-ripened cream is a butter of perfection, like a perfectly ripened fruit.
Pour sweet or cultured cream into the churn, leaving headroom for the cream to expand when whipped.
Elsewhere in the building, though, there is another kind of churn. That would be in the circulation department, where churn refers to the constant turning over of subscriptions.
That's a lot of churn. No wonder circulation directors are often the most haggard-looking people at the paper.
Telemarketing was the lazy solution to churn, but the federal "do not call" legislation pretty much put an end to that.
When these organisms sank to the bottom, they consumed the oxygen that sustains bottom-dwelling animals, which normally churn up laminated sediments.