chronic

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chronic

n. very high quality marijuana containing lots of THC. (Probably from the association of THC with the use of marijuana in cases of chronic pain.) Where can I get some genuine chronic.
References in periodicals archive ?
The authors concluded there was a high prevalence of acute and chronic pain in individuals on hemodialysis (as high as 82% acute, 92% chronic), and pain associated with vascular access is one of the many types of pain experienced by people on hemodialysis.
Research suggesting that antisocial traits are entrenched by mid-adolescence and that an early age of onset of criminal behavior is a reliable predictor of chronic offending and criminal versatility refutes the research cited in Miller that an early age of criminal behavior enhances the prospect that these deficiencies will be reformed as neurological development occurs over time.
COSTS OF POTENTIALLY AVOIDABLE COMPLICATIONS (PACs) ARE A SIGNIFICANT DRIVER OF TOTAL CHRONIC CARE COST
The semantic distinction between status and act is somewhat tenuous to begin with, and in the context of homelessness and chronic alcoholism, it arguably loses all meaning, since being a member of a given status may make it impossible to avoid performing certain actions.
The recipe, she explains, comes to her from "the Lady Penyvere, great aunt, by the mother's side, to la belle Rosette, maid of honour to the queen" (115); likewise, she advises him "to apply to old lady Lincoln, who hath in her family receipt-book, many renowned cures for chronics.
John's: The Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN) Chemistry Club, the Chronics, was responsible for two chemistry exhibits.
Although an incurable list was maintained, the governors acquired a better class of patients -- the percentage of paying patients growing and chronics declining.
But most of those who landed in court a second time before their 16th birthdays became persistent repeaters, and the earlier their first prosecution, the more likely they were to be violent chronics.
Still others remained in their clinical area, but distanced themselves emotionally from what was happening: "Probably since that time, I don't like to care for chronics.
1994), "Maimondes and his economic ideas", Zikhronot Chronics, Athens, November-December.
What the Chronics are - or most of us - are machines with flaws inside that can't be repaired, flaws born in, or flaws beat in over so many years of the guy running head-on into solid things that by the time the hospital found him he was bleeding rust in some vacant lot.
1989) (finding the male rate of recidivism to be approximately three times higher for men than for women in the 1958 cohort); Denno, supra, at 105 (reporting that males are far more likely than females to be chronic repeat offenders and that "female chronics committed fewer and less severe crimes than their male counterparts").
1985) pointed out that chronic offenders (or |chronics') had only been identified retrospectively, and that penal policies such as selective incapacitation could only be contemplated if chronics could be identified prospectively.
He urged for a positive action aimed at helping them come out of the chronics as per International Labour Organization.