chrome

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chrome dome

A person who is completely bald, or that person's head. I actually started losing my hair in my late twenties, and I've been a chrome dome ever since! Some women don't care for bald men, but I love my husband's chrome dome.
See also: chrome, dome

chrome horn

A car's front bumper when used to nudge or hit the car in front of it, either in retaliation or (in stock car racing) to inform the second car's driver that the first intends to pass. Always be considerate when changing lanes in front of other cars, as aggressive drivers may feel inclined to use their chrome horns to signal their displeasure. Some really aggressive driving by Roberts; he's been putting that chrome horn to use today!
See also: chrome, horn

chrome-dome

n. a shiny, bald head; a man with a bald head. (Also a rude term of address.) The guy with the chrome-dome suddenly grasped his chest and made a face.
References in periodicals archive ?
But Chrome didn't let me choose a zoom percentage for the printout as Firefox and IE did, nor did it let me turn page headers on and off or choose margin sizes in a Page Setup dialog as those two did.
Minimalism has been a hallmark of Chrome since its first beta release.
Another theme in the Chrome interface is that everything looks like a Web page, displaying in the main browser window, rather than in separate dialog boxes.
This is one of the niftiest things added to Chrome in a while.
Chrome can also boast a less visible and less touted way of speeding up browser: it supports SPDY, an HTTP replacement that compresses header data and allows persistent connections between server and browsers.
The ferro chrome project is expected to generate around 300 direct and indirect jobs in the first phase, which will go up to 600 when the second phase is complete.
Aziz said the ferro chrome project offers an opportunity for setting up downstream industries.
Responding to Kember complaints, head of Chrome security technology, Justin Schuh, said that even if the browser supported a master password, that wouldn't stop a hacker with physical access to a victim's computer from installing malware and obtaining passwords.
Referring to Chrome's mass-market appeal and its consumers, Kember added: "They don't know it works like this.
When a new password is entered while using the browser, OS X states that Chrome "wants to use your confidential information...in your keychain.
By using language like 'confidential' and referring to OS X's master password-protected Keychain application, the message indicates that the new password will be safe, and Chrome's knowledge of it will be as secure as Keychain, but this is not the case.
Cluley says "it seems very odd" that Chrome insists users import passwords along with their bookmarks from other browsers, especially as Chrome "isn't offering the most rudimentary level of protection...Google's handling of the situation seems particularly lax."