chow

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blow chow

slang To vomit. I felt like I was going to blow chow from seasickness out on that boat.
See also: blow, chow

blow chunks

slang To vomit, especially violently or in great amount. I felt like I was going to blow chunks from seasickness out on that boat.
See also: blow, chunk

chow down

To eat, often quickly or enthusiastically. A noun or pronoun can be used between "chow" and "down." The puppy started chowing down the minute I set down his food bowl. Get in here so we can chow down—I'm starving!
See also: chow, down

chowhound

Someone who eats a lot and/or very much enjoys eating. Brian's a real chow hound, so I'm sure he'll eat anything you prepare for dinner.

ciao

Good-bye (in Italian). Ciao, dear. Hope to see you at the beach later.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

chow (something) down

Sl. to eat something, usually quickly or without good manners. We can chow this pizza down in about two minutes! I found a box of cookies and chowed it down before anybody knew what I was doing.
See also: chow, down
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

chow down

Eat, as in He's always ready to chow down at dinner time. Originally military slang, this term is now more widely used. The noun chow in the sense of food, originating from either Chinese or pidgin English in the 18th century, also appears in such terms as chow line, a line of people waiting for food, and chow time, mealtime. [Slang; mid-1900s]
See also: chow, down
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

blow ˈchunks

(American English, slang) vomit (= bring food from the stomach back out through the mouth): Harry is green — looks like he’s going to blow chunks.
See also: blow, chunk
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

chow down

v.
To eat something greedily or voraciously: We chowed down on the wild berries until the bush was bare. I dropped my sandwich on the ground and the dog chowed it down.
See also: chow, down
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

blow chunks

and blow chow and blow grits and blow lunch
tv. to vomit. She drank too much and left the room to blow chunks. Oh my God! She’s blowing grits on my sofa!
See also: blow, chunk

blow chow

verb
See also: blow, chow

chow

1. n. food. What time is chow served around here?
2. tv. & in. to eat (something). (see also chow down.) I’ve been chowing canned tuna and stale bagels to save money.
3. Go to ciao.

chow down

in. to eat; to take a meal. Over there is where we chow down.
See also: chow, down

chow hound

n. someone who loves to eat; a heavy eater. Okay, listen up all you chow hounds. There’s extra beans tonight!
See also: chow, hound

chow something down

tv. to eat something, probably quickly or without good manners. I found a box of cookies and chowed it down before anybody knew what I was doing.
See also: chow, down, something

ciao

and chow (tʃɑʊ)
Good-bye. (Italian.) Ciao! See you soon. Chow, baby. Call my service.

chow

verb
See ciao
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
'You learn much quicker because you're putting your money in.' For Chow, dedication is everything.
Mr Chow likens this high to the experience of winning at poker.
'I've never stopped being an artist,' says Chow. 'I was always doing environments and creating theatre in my restaurants.
While Chow might approach every aspect of his life as an art project, living in a city in which everyone from actors to dog groomers gets called an 'artist', he is definitive about what is and is not art.
If you think New York parents are neurotic about getting their kids into Harvard, try talking to Gerald and Lily Chow, the Hong Kong couple who just spent $2.2 million over four years on a tutoring service that promised an acceptance letter, only to have both of their sons rejected from the oldest Ivy League school.
The suit reads, "Gerald and Lily Chow have sought the best educational opportunities for their children.
The suit also charges that in the summer of 2009, Zimny suggested that the Chow boys attend an SAT tutoring camp, and that he would pay for room and board and bill the parents later.
Finally in the fall of 2009, Gerald Chow approached the headmaster of the school where his younger son was a student and asked if the school had received any of the contributions Zimny had promised to make.
In the street, Fung comes across Mighty Steel Leg (Chow), a Shaolin kung fu practitioner reduced to selling garbage who dreams of repackaging his skills.
That's it for plot, but Chow, along with his regular directing partner Lee Lik-chee, shows a mature blending of character comedy and physical action throughout the picture.
And as always, Chow shows himself an acute parodist of other genres while adding his own cherry on the top.
Between times, she gets one tour-de-force sequence that moves from comedy (showing up as a cross between Anita Mui and Joey Wang in "A Chinese Ghost Story"), through a show of self-confidence against her bullying female boss, to a touching romantic letdown with Chow.
Chow begins by emphasizing the importance of Chinese entrepreneurs in China's transformation.
In the area of human capital formation, Chow recommends making it easier for academics to travel abroad, ending local governments' monopoly on the supply of healthcare, and increasing the mobility of labor by reforming the hukou (internal passport) system.
In discussing China's economic development since 1989, Chow notes the critical role of human capital and market institutions, and the fact that China could "leapfrog" by adopting advanced Western technology--made possible by opening trade and investment channels and allowing nonstate enterprises (including joint ventures) to prosper.