chowhound

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chowhound

Someone who eats a lot and/or very much enjoys eating. Brian's a real chow hound, so I'm sure he'll eat anything you prepare for dinner.

chow hound

n. someone who loves to eat; a heavy eater. Okay, listen up all you chow hounds. There’s extra beans tonight!
See also: chow, hound
References in periodicals archive ?
In researching this piece, I created a thread on my favorite discussion board, Chowhound.com, titled "Calling All Bloggers: Why Do You Do It?" (2) One respondent, EatingLA's journalist-by-day author, explains simply that she "had recently started inviting friends to eat at Chinese restaurants and wanted a way to remember what we ate," adding by e-mail that "it's been really interesting to start this blog with no real plan in mind and have it turn into a fairly established community resource." Community resource, note, not news source--a difference one of her early posts reveals in all its comic nonchalance: "I was glad Thi arrived just in time to insist we get the winter melon with crab roe.
Meanwhile, as my friend and Boston-based colleague MC Slim JB once observed in yet another Chowhound thread, "It's an endless challenge coming up with fresh ways to describe food experiences week in and week out; I catch myself reusing certain stock adjectives, and it's painful" ("Cringe-worthy Words in Restaurant Reviews").
I've had two dogs who were real chowhounds, including my 16-year-old Piglet, and even a single missed meal has me rushing them to the vet.
Only diet hucksters and true chowhounds would benefit from a world where the local McDonald's gave way to places serving 72-ounce steaks and burgers that reach toward the heavens like Manhattan skyscrapers.
Sleek banquettes provide the perfect backdrop to see and be seen, while an impressive sake list and quality dishes like white-asparagus salad with Dungeness crab will draw curious chowhounds. Snag a table before the looky-loos catch on.
Active attorneys general were derisively labeled "Chowhounds" in the 1980s for their efforts in food nutrition labeling, but they are garnering more positive attention now, perhaps highlighted by New York's Spitzer for his efforts to oversee financial firm behavior.
Now, this entire family of words calling to mind the unbridled appetite of gluttons, of face stuffers, of scarfers, of chowhounds, of epicurean swine, is utterly foreign to French culture and to la gourmandise, which remains the admirable activity of the gourmand.
Some dogs are real masters at being chowhounds and give you those begging eyes when you sit down to eat.