choose (one's) battles (wisely)

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choose (one's) battles (wisely)

To actively choose not to participate in minor, unimportant, or overly difficult arguments, contests, or confrontations, saving one's strength instead for those that will be of greater importance or in which one has a greater chance of success. As a parent, you learn to choose your battles with your kids so you don't run yourself ragged nagging them. The best politicians choose their battles wisely: if one becomes too embroiled in petty debates, one never gets anything done.
See also: battle, choose
References in periodicals archive ?
But then, may makikita ka talagang 'di maganda once in a while." According to her, if you are not used to that kind of attention or number of people looking at you, "you just need to choose your battles.
You have to pick and choose your battles," he said.
Sometimes as a driver, you want to go all-out in every race and try to finish in first or second in every race, but to win a championship you need to choose your battles and play the long game.
'In life, you need to choose your battles,' he said wisely.
At home, choose your battles, give yourself a break
You can always choose your battles. Live for today, fight for tomorrow.
Dear Mom or Dad, please choose your battles. Please step back and evaluate if this is something worth fighting for, or if you think you can apologize and brush this off because coming home to your children alive is much more important than your bruised ego.
While we support our judiciary in their honest efforts, we believe that the maxim 'choose your battles' is a pertinent one in this case.
Lucy with Bradley Walsh on The Chase Your new stand-up comedy show Choose Your Battles was a smash hit at the Edinburgh Fringe.
Choose your battles. This one's actually OK unless there's a condition in the small print that prevents choosing all of them.
Choose your battles wisely.' I have learned that I have to be strategic about saving my battles for big important issues and evaluating my priorities regularly.
Karen Goggin, my old supervisor at NAA, always told me some things are out of your control and you have to choose your battles.