chin

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have more chins than a Chinese phone book

offensive To be exceptionally or exceedingly fat, i.e., having multiple rolls of fat (chins) on one's neck. Intended as a humorous insult, the phrase is a pun on the word chin and the supposed commonness of "Chin" as a Chinese surname. Your mama is so fat, she has more chins than a Chinese phone book!
See also: book, chin, Chinese, have, more, phone

chin music

slang Talk or chatter. Can you guys please be quiet? Your chin music is distracting me from my work.
See also: chin, music

chin up

1. A phrase that encourages one to improve one's mood, especially when sad or discouraged. Come on, the project was not a total failure—chin up! Chin up, honey—tomorrow's another day.
2. noun The act of pulling oneself upward while holding onto a bar, as at a gym. In this usage, the phrase is often hyphenated. My arms are already shaking—how many more chin-ups am I supposed to do?
See also: chin, up

chuck (one) under the chin

To touch or stroke one affectionately under the chin. I chucked my daughter under the chin and pulled her close for a hug.
See also: chin, chuck

be up to (one's) chin in (something)

To have too much of something; to be overwhelmed by something. I'm still unpacking, so I'm up to my chin in boxes. If any of my guys get hurt at the construction site, I'll be up to my chin in paperwork.
See also: chin, up

take (something) on the chin

1. Literally, to receive an impact, especially a punch, on one's chin. He took the heavyweight champ's deadly left hook on the chin, and he was knocked out cold then and there.
2. To endure some hardship, difficulty, setback, or defeat, especially with stoic courage or poise. He just took the criticism on the chin and kept working on his art. I know you're feeling down about the loss, but just take it on the chin and practice harder tomorrow.
3. To receive or suffer the full brunt of a defeat, setback, or hardship. Our boss messes around with the company's money, but we're the ones who have to take it on the chin when things go wrong. Dave has been fired before, but this was his dream job, so he really took this one on the chin.
See also: chin, on, take

lead with (one's) chin

1. Literally, to approach an opponent with one's chin out in the open, thus making it easier to be hit. The cocky fighter led with his chin, daring the underdog to take a swing.
2. By extension, to do or say something aggressively and without caution. The venture capitalist, famous for leading with his chin when it comes to securing investments, is being investigated for fraud and money laundering allegations.
See also: chin, lead

stick (one's) chin out

To show resolve, determination, and fortitude. Despite the team's performance in recent years, their star player has shown a remarkable amount of character by sticking his chin out and publicly reiterating his commitment and loyalty to the team. It would have been really easy for the manager to just follow to the board members' instructions to the round of layoffs, but instead she stuck her chin out, protested and fought for the rights of her team, and in the end managed to keep their jobs.
See also: chin, out, stick

chin music

Fig. Inf. talk; conversation. Whenever those two get together, you can be sure there'll be plenty of chin music. Bill just loves to hear himself talk. He'll make chin music for hours at a time.
See also: chin, music

chuck someone under the chin

to tap someone, as a child, lightly under the chin, as a sign of affection. He said hello to little Mary and chucked her under the chin. Please don't chuck me under the chin! I am not a child, you know!
See also: chin, chuck

keep one's chin up

Fig. to keep one's spirits high; to act brave and confident. Keep your chin up, John. Things will get better. Just keep your chin up and tell the judge exactly what happened.
See also: chin, keep, up

Keep your chin up.

Fig. an expression of encouragement to someone who has to bear some emotional burdens. (Fixed order.) Fred: I really can't take much more of this. Jane: Keep your chin up. Things will get better. John: Smile, Fred. Keep your chin up. Fred: I guess you're right. I just get so depressed when I think of this mess I'm in.
See also: chin, keep, up

make chin music

Fig. to talk or chatter. We sat around all evening making chin music. You were making chin music when you should have been listening.
See also: chin, make, music

take it on the chin

 and take it on the nose 
1. Lit. to stand up to something adverse, such as criticism. (Fig. on taking a direct punch to the head in boxing.) They laid some blunt criticism on him, but he took it on the chin. I knew he could take it on the nose.
2. Fig. to receive the full brunt of something. Why do I have to take it on the chin for something I didn't do? If you did it, you have to learn to take it on the chin.
See also: chin, on, take

take something on the chin

 
1. Lit. to absorb a blow on the chin. The boxer tried to duck but took the blow on the chin.
2. Fig. to experience and endure bad news or other trouble. The bad news was a real shock, but John took it on the chin. The worst luck comes my way, and I always end up taking it on the chin.
See also: chin, on, take

wag one's chin

Rur. to talk. She loves to visit. She'll wag her chin for hours. He was on the phone, wagging his chin to his buddy.
See also: chin, wag

keep one's chin up

Be stalwart and courageous in a difficult situation, as in Don't let the loan officer intimidate you; keep your chin up, or Despite all the difficulty, he kept his chin up. This expression alludes to a posture of firm resolution. [First half of 1900s]
See also: chin, keep, up

lead with one's chin

Take a risk, behave without caution. For example, Gordon always says exactly what he thinks; he never minds leading with his chin. This term alludes to a boxer leaving his chin, a vulnerable point, unprotected. [Mid-1900s]
See also: chin, lead

take it on the chin

Suffer adversity or defeat, as in Paul really took it on the chin today when he got fired for missing a deadline. This idiom alludes to taking a physical blow on the chin. [First half of 1900s]
See also: chin, on, take

keep your chin up

If you keep your chin up, you stay cheerful in a difficult or unpleasant situation. Richards was keeping his chin up yesterday despite the continued setbacks. Keep your chin up: things will get better.
See also: chin, keep, up

lead with your chin

mainly BRITISH
If someone leads with their chin, they behave very aggressively, causing a fight or argument. We don't plan to attack the administration for not spending more on education. There's nothing to be gained from leading with our chins. Note: This expression comes from boxing, and refers to a boxer fighting with their chin sticking out, making it easy for their opponent to hit it.
See also: chin, lead

take it on the chin

COMMON If you take it on the chin, you bravely accept criticism or a difficult situation. When the police arrived, he took it on the chin, apologising for the trouble he'd caused them. We've taken a big loss. We've taken it on the chin. But we're out there and we're going to stay in business. Note: Nouns such as criticism and defeat are sometimes used instead of it. Andrew is intelligent and wants to learn. He is also prepared to take criticism on the chin, which is a good thing. Note: This refers to someone being punched on the jaw but not falling down.
See also: chin, on, take

keep your chin up

remain cheerful in difficult circumstances. informal
See also: chin, keep, up

take it on the chin

endure or accept misfortune courageously.
The image here is of a boxing blow taken squarely on the chin.
1998 Times The occasional ‘bad 'un’ [i.e. decision] is inevitable, and when it comes… the players must take it on the chin.
See also: chin, on, take

lead with your chin

behave or speak incautiously. informal
This expression originated as mid 20th-century boxing slang, referring to a boxer's stance that leaves his chin unprotected.
See also: chin, lead

stick your chin out

show firmness or fortitude.
See also: chin, out, stick

(keep your) ˈchin up

(British English also keep your ˈpecker up old-fashioned) (spoken) used to tell somebody to stay cheerful in difficult circumstances: Chin up! Things will get better soon.
See also: chin, up

take something on the ˈchin

(informal) accept a difficult or an unpleasant situation without complaining, trying to make excuses, etc: Losing his job after so many years was a great shock, but he took it on the chin.
See also: chin, on, something, take

take it on the chin

and take it on the nose
1. tv. to stand up to something adverse, such as criticism. (Chin is more common.) They laid some rude chops on him, but he took it on the chin.
2. tv. to receive the full brunt of something. Why do I have to take it on the nose for something I didn’t do?
See also: chin, on, take

wag one’s chin

tv. to talk or jabber; to chatter aimlessly. The two old buzzards sat on the park bench wagging their chins all afternoon.
See also: chin, wag

keep (one's) chin up

To be stalwart, courageous, or optimistic in the face of difficulty.
See also: chin, keep, up

take it on the chin

Slang
To endure punishment, suffering, or defeat.
See also: chin, on, take
References in periodicals archive ?
Neither man was required to spend a single day in jail for beating Vincent Chin to death.
Asian-American community leaders from across Michigan gathered at the Golden Star restaurant in Ferndale, where Chin had worked as a waiter on weekends.
ere was no caveman cleft chin so we'd have had no neanderthal John Travolta hence there never having been a Jurassic Period Fever captured in cave paintings.
Researchers led by anthropologist Dr James Pampush collected chin data (yes, there is such a thing) from more than 100 primate species and compared it with historical data.
Last year the American Society of Plastic Surgeons revealed chin jobs were the fastest growing type of cosmetic procedure in the US, with 20,680 operations in 2011, up 71% on the previous year.
Ireland has slowly been catching on to the trend with requests for chin jobs rising steadily in the past year - and the reason behind the surgery boom is that chin implants, such as facelifts, help people look younger.
DSS argued unsuccessfully in court that the parent isn't entitled to be represented at the hearings because a CHINS proceeding focuses on a child's behavior, not the fitness of a parent.
ROBBIE WILLIAMS Robbie may have shifted the disgusting beer gut he sported a few years ago, but he still has more work to do in the chin department.
There may be several competitive vendor-owned CHINs in a community.
The result has been the rapid, but still incomplete, development of systems to support integrated delivery and the lagging development of CHINs.
In the third example, the woman's hand is placed beside her chin.
You don't see many thin people with a double chin and most people find their extra chin disappears along with their spare tyre when they lose weight.
Of particular importance to the development and operation of CHINs are three safety zones created by the agencies that insulate certain kinds of data dissemination.
Chin-o-meter rating: 4 He may have a voice like an angel (or something) and be an all-round nice boy but he has a chin that would terrify small children.
Fifty years ago, for instance, Chin would have been described as a Negro secretary.