china


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Related to china: History of China
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a bull in a china shop

One who is aggressive and clumsy in a situation that requires delicacy and care. My son is always like a bull in a china shop, so I'm worried about taking him to the museum. Surrounding him with valuables does not seem like a wise idea! This is a complex problem, and if you attack it like a bull in a china shop, you will alienate a lot of people.
See also: bull, china, shop

all Lombard Street to a China orange

Very probable or likely. London's Lombard Street has long been associated with the banking industry, while a "China orange" is considered an ordinary, unimportant thing. We'll definitely be able to beat the worst team in the league—it's all Lombard Street to a China orange.
See also: all, china, orange, street

all the tea in China

A priceless amount or value; something of such great value that it cannot be quantified. China has historically been one of the world's largest tea producers. Just a glimpse of your smile is worth all the tea in China to me.
See also: all, china, tea

be like a bull in a china shop

To be aggressive and clumsy in a situation that requires delicacy and care. My son is always like a bull in a china shop, so I'm worried about taking him to the museum. Surrounding him with valuables does not seem like a wise idea! This is a complex problem, and if you attack it like a bull in a china shop, you will alienate a lot of people.
See also: bull, china, like, shop

china

slang A close friend. The term comes from rhyming slang in which "china" is short for "china plate," which rhymes with "mate." Primarily heard in UK, Australia. Bring your china to the show then—the more, the merrier. It's always great to spend time with my old china.

china plate

slang A close friend. The phrase comes from rhyming slang in which "china plate" rhymes with "mate." Primarily heard in UK, Australia. Bring your china plate to the show then—the more, the merrier. It's always great to spend time with my old china plate.
See also: china, plate

China syndrome

A scenario in which a nuclear reactor meltdown in North America would theoretically melt a hole straight through the Earth to China (which is impossible). In more realistic usage, it describes such a meltdown reaching groundwater and forcing subsequent radioactive gases into the atmosphere. The latter scenario was used as the basis of a 1979 film of the same name starring Jack Lemmon and Jane Fonda. While many advocate nuclear power as clean and safe, the risk of catastrophes such as China syndrome make me very nervous about its use.
See also: china, syndrome

made in China

A phrase printed on objects (or on the labels attached to objects) that have been produced in factories in China. The phrase is sometimes used derisively to highlight a lack of quality. I thought this piece was handcrafted by European artisans, but look—it says "made in China" on the bottom! I took up pottery because I was sick of using flimsy plastic cups that had been made in China!
See also: china, made

not for all the tea in China

Not for any reason or incentive whatsoever; not for anything. China has historically been one of the world's largest tea producers. But I absolutely love this jacket—I wouldn't sell it, not for all the tea in China! I'm never flying through that airport again! Not for all the tea in China!
See also: all, china, not, tea

on a slow boat to China

On a course or trajectory that will take a very long amount of time, especially with the conclusion or destination being uncertain. Sometimes used humorously or facetiously. It's been three weeks since I ordered those clothes online—is the package on a slow boat to China or something? Unfortunately, our investments seem to be on a slow boat to China at the moment due to the volatility of the market.
See also: boat, china, on, slow

only Nixon could go to China

A phrase used to highlight a political leader's unique ability to accomplish something particularly daunting or taboo. It refers to US President Richard Nixon's landmark 1972 visit to Communist China, which established diplomatic relations between the two nations. With all of your connections, I think you'll be the first mayor to get a train station built in our town—only Nixon could go to China, right?
See also: china, could, go

what does that have to do with the price of tea in China

A rhetorical question calling attention to a non-sequitur or irrelevant statement or suggestion made by another person. Yes, I agree that health care is an important issue, but what does that have to do with the price of tea in China? We're discussing tax incentives for local businesses—not exactly a related topic!
See also: china, does, have, of, price, tea, that, what

What's that got to do with the price of tea in China?

A rhetorical question calling attention to a non-sequitur or irrelevant statement or suggestion made by another person. Yes, I agree that health care is an important issue, but what's that got to do with the price of tea in China? We're discussing tax incentives for local businesses—not exactly a related topic!
See also: of, price, tea, that

when (something) sneezes, (something else) catches a cold

When a person, group, or entity has a problem or experiences a negative situation, a related person, group, or entity will consequently have a worse problem or will experience a more negative situation. When Paris sneezes, Europe catches a cold. Terrorism in France affects security throughout the continent.
See also: catch, cold

wouldn't do (something) for all the tea in China

Would not do something for any reason or incentive whatsoever. China has historically been one of the world's largest tea producers. But I absolutely love this jacket—I wouldn't sell it for all the tea in China! God, after my horrible experience this summer, I wouldn't go back to that country again for all the tea in China.
See also: all, china, tea

*bull in a china shop

Prov. a very clumsy creature in a delicate situation. (*Typically: as awkward as ~; like ~.) I never know what to say at a funeral. I feel like a bull in a china shop, trampling on feelings without even meaning to. Lester felt like a bull in a china shop; reaching for an orange, he made several elaborate pyramids of fruit tumble down.
See also: bull, china, shop

not for all the tea in China

Fig. not even if you rewarded me with all the tea in China; not for anything at all. No I won't do it—not for all the tea in China.
See also: all, china, not, tea

bull in a china shop

An extremely clumsy person, as in Her living room, with its delicate furniture and knickknacks, made him feel like a bull in a china shop . The precise origin for this term has been lost; it was first recorded in Frederick Marryat's novel, Jacob Faithful (1834).
See also: bull, china, shop

not for all the tea in China

Not at any price, never, as in I wouldn't give up my car, not for all the tea in China. This term originated in Australia and alludes to the presumed huge quantity of tea in China. [Late 1800s] Also see for all the world; not for love or money.
See also: all, china, not, tea

a bull in a china shop

If someone is like a a bull in a china shop, they say or do things too quickly and without considering them enough, and often upset people or damage things. In confrontational situations I am like a bull in a china shop. Although you must take charge of your life, you mustn't go at it like a bull in a china shop.
See also: bull, china, shop

when the US/UK/China, etc. sneezes, Japan/Germany, etc. catches cold

or

when the US/UK/China, etc. sneezes, Japan/Germany, etc. catches a cold

mainly BRITISH
If you say that when a particular country sneezes, another catches cold, or catches a cold, you mean that what happens to the first country has a great effect or influence on the second. And when the American economy sneezes, the City of London catches cold. As they say, when America sneezes the rest of the world catches a cold.
See also: catch, cold, japan, UK

not for all the tea in China

If you say that you would not do something for all the tea in China, you mean that you definitely will not do it. I wouldn't go through that again for all the tea in China. He would not change his job for all the tea in China. Note: In the past, all tea came from China.
See also: all, china, not, tea

like a bull in a china shop

behaving recklessly and clumsily in a place or situation where you are likely to cause damage or injury.
See also: bull, china, like, shop

all Lombard Street to a China orange

great wealth against one ordinary object; virtual certainty. dated
Lombard Street in London was originally occupied by bankers from Lombardy, and it still contains a number of London's principal banks. This idiom dates from the early 19th century, but the use of a China orange to mean ‘a worthless thing’ is recorded earlier.
See also: all, china, orange, street

not for all the tea in China

not at any price; certainly not! informal
See also: all, china, not, tea

like a ˌbull in a ˈchina shop

very careless or clumsy, especially in a situation where you need to be careful: He was like a bull in a china shop, treading on everyone’s feet and apologizing constantly.The Prime Minister went into the negotiations like a bull in a china shop and only made the relations between the two countries worse.
See also: bull, china, like, shop

wouldn’t do something for all the tea in ˈChina

(informal) never; not for any reason at all: ‘If you marry him you’ll be a rich woman.’ ‘I wouldn’t marry him for all the tea in China.’
See also: all, china, something, tea

China

n. the teeth. (see also ivories.) I spent a damn fortune trying to get this China fixed up.

bull in a china shop (like a)

Clumsy, awkward. There are numerous theories concerning the origin of this expression, which probably was not an actual break-in by a bull. One of Aesop’s fables concerns an ass in a potter’s shop, and Charles Funk long ago suggested that a nineteenth-century British cartoonist used this idea in caricaturing John Bull (symbol for England) and his awkward dealings with the China trade. The earliest use of the precise expression found so far is in Frederick Marryat’s novel Jacob Faithful (1834).
See also: bull, china, shop

not for all the tea in China

Not at any price. Eminent lexicographers agree that this term originated in Australia in the 1890s and soon spread to the rest of the tea-drinking English-speaking world. The OED cites K. Tennant’s Ride on, Stranger (1943): “I’m not going to stand in my girl’s light for all the tea in China.”
See also: all, china, not, tea

bull in a china shop

Clumsily destructive. An early written example of the expression appeared in Frederick Marryat's 1834 novel, Jacob Faithful , although the image of a bull wrecking havoc as he wandered among tables and shelves of fine porcelain can be traced a century earlier. The expression can also be found in several European languages, although the animal in question is an elephant. In 1940, an American press agent led a bull through a New York City china shop as a publicity stunt. The bull didn't break anything, but a bystander trying to avoid the bull backed into a table and caused the damage.
See also: bull, china, shop

slow boat to China

A very long time. A poker players' expression for a player who constantly lost was “I'd like to get you on a slow boat to China,” meaning that the others would have all the time in the world to win the guy's money. Composer Frank Loesser used the phrase as the title and the first line of a 1948 romantic ballad, and the expression started being used as a compliment.
See also: boat, china, slow
References in classic literature ?
Such was the unparalleled invasion of China. For that billion of people there was no hope.
China had laughed at war, and war she was getting, but it was ultra-modern war, twentieth century war, the war of the scientist and the laboratory, the war of Jacobus Laningdale.
During all the summer and fall of 1976 China was an inferno.
These expeditions were small, composed of scientists and bodies of troops; but they entered China from every side.
The representatives of the nations of the world, being present, all nations solemnly pledged themselves never to use against one another the laboratory methods of warfare they had employed in the invasion of China.
The "2019 China Surgical Procedure Volumes Database" database has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.
Under both its "Choose a Country" option on its mobile version and under its "Store Locator" section on its desktop version, Moncler was found to be listing China as "Republic of China," the current official name of the country of Taiwan, reported Liberty Times.
The only option for Angola to avoid default is to turn to China, or go back to the market.
He added that no country should doubt China's determination and will to safeguard the peace and stability of the South China Sea.
Air China parent pushes China Eastern to raise share price in sale to Singapore Airlines.
MOABC.com is a leading mobile Internet portal in China with 11 million registered users and boasts one of the top-ranked mobile Internet sites, featuring mobile social networking, mobile games, and entertainment.
China pledged to increase aid to $5 billion, in the form of export credits and preferential loans over the next three years.
Today, the Communist Party still controls China, yet the country's people are anything but locked in place.
If we are granted production approval, CHBP will be one of only four pharmaceutical companies producing Desloratadine tablets in China through 2010.