References in classic literature ?
The parts that pleased her most were the Revelations and the Prophecies,--parts whose dim and wondrous imagery, and fervent language, impressed her the more, that she questioned vainly of their meaning;--and she and her simple friend, the old child and the young one, felt just alike about it.
"Don't you see,--there?" said the child, pointing to the glassy water, which, as it rose and fell, reflected the golden glow of the sky.
Her only real comfort was when the child lay in the placidity of sleep.
Nothing was more remarkable than the instinct, as it seemed, with which the child comprehended her loneliness: the destiny that had drawn an inviolable circle round about her: the whole peculiarity, in short, of her position in respect to other children.
"Who art thou?" said the Giant, and a strange awe fell on him, and he knelt before the little child.
And the child smiled on the Giant, and said to him, "You let me play once in your garden, to-day you shall come with me to my garden, which is Paradise."
The softly glowing vision of the child moved away before me among the trees.
But the poor mother ran out of the house and cried aloud for her child.
For my part, my curiosity and interest were at least equal to the child's, for child she certainly was, although I thought it probably from what I could make out, that her very small and delicate frame imparted a peculiar youthfulness to her appearance.
"Yet may his child be otherwise, Mother of the Heavens!
But, after opening the house-door, she stood an instant on the threshold, hesitating whether she ought to ask the child to come in, or whether she should even speak to her.
The only thing I found in all her conversation on these subjects that gave me any distaste, was, that one time in discouraging about my being far gone with child, and the time I expected to come, she said something that looked as if she could help me off with my burthen sooner, if I was willing; or, in English, that she could give me something to make me miscarry, if I had a desire to put an end to my troubles that way; but I soon let her see that I abhorred the thoughts of it; and, to do her justice, she put it off so cleverly, that I could not say she really intended it, or whether she only mentioned the practice as a horrible thing; for she couched her words so well, and took my meaning so quickly, that she gave her negative before I could explain myself.
"Oh my daughter!" she said, "my daughter, my poor, dear little child, so I shall never see thee more!
She opened the door of a room on the floor below and took the child over to a bed in which a woman was lying.
"It's very well that I'm teaching Grisha, but of course that's only because I am free myself now, I'm not with child. Stiva, of course, there's no counting on.
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