cheer

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Bronx cheer

A sputtering noise made by pressing the tongue and lips together, used to express either real or faux contempt, mockery, or displeasure; a raspberry. Primarily heard in US. The fans collectively gave the opposing team a Bronx cheer when their relief pitcher walked onto the field.
See also: Bronx, cheer

cheer for (someone or something)

To vocally support or encourage someone or something. Who are you cheering for in this match? The whole town came out to cheer for the high school football team in the championship game.
See also: cheer

cheer on

To support or encourage someone or something, often vocally. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cheer" and "on." I'm your mother—I'm going to cheer you on in anything you do! The whole town came out to cheer on the high school football team in the championship game.
See also: cheer, on

cheer (one) to the echo

informal To vocally support or encourage one. Primarily heard in UK. The fans really cheered us to the echo in the championship game.
See also: cheer, echo

cheer up

1. An imperative to improve one's mood, especially when sad or discouraged. Come on, the project was not a total failure—cheer up! Cheer up, honey—tomorrow's another day.
2. verb To induce one to become happier, especially when one is sad or discouraged. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cheer" and "up." I don't know how to cheer Paul up—he's been completely miserable since he found out he didn't get that job. Grandpa could always cheer up Sarah when she was sad about something.
See also: cheer, up

of good cheer

Filled with or characterized by mirth, happiness, and optimism. Now is the season of good cheer, a time to be with family and make merry. The production is very much of good cheer. If it fails to put a smile on your face, you are nothing but a grouch.
See also: cheer, good, of

cheer for someone or something

to give a shout of encouragement for someone or something. Everyone cheered for the team. I cheered for the winning goal.
See also: cheer

cheer someone or something on

to encourage someone or a group to continue to do well, as by cheering. We cheered them on, and they won. We cheered on the team. Sam cheered Jane on.
See also: cheer, on

cheer someone up

to make a sad person happy. When Bill was sick, Ann tried to cheer him up by reading to him. Interest rates went up, and that cheered up all the bankers.
See also: cheer, up

cheer up

[for a sad person] to become happy. After a while, she began to cheer up and smile more. Cheer up! Things could be worse.
See also: cheer, up

cheer on

Encourage, as in The crowd was cheering on all the marathon runners. Originating in the 1400s simply as cheer, this usage was augmented by on in the early 1800s.
See also: cheer, on

cheer up

Become or make happy, raise the spirits of, as in This fine weather should cheer you up. This term may also be used as an imperative, as Shakespeare did ( 2 Henry IV, 4:4): "My sovereign lord, cheer up yourself." [Late 1500s]
See also: cheer, up

a Bronx cheer

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
A Bronx cheer is a rude noise that you make by putting your lips together and blowing through them. He greeted the news with a loud Bronx cheer.
See also: Bronx, cheer

cheer someone to the echo

BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If you cheer someone to the echo, you applaud them loudly for a long time. They cheered him to the echo, as they did every member of the cast.
See also: cheer, echo, someone

of good cheer

cheerful or optimistic. archaic
The exhortation to be of good cheer occurs in several passages of the New Testament in the Authorized Version of the Bible (for example in Matthew 9:2, John 16:33, and Acts 27:22). In Middle English, cheer had the meaning ‘face’. This sense of cheer is now obsolete, but the related senses of ‘countenance’ and ‘demeanour as reflected in the countenance’ survive in a number of phrases, including in good cheer and the archaic what cheer ? (how are you?).
See also: cheer, good, of

cheer on

v.
To encourage someone with or as if with cheers: The spectators cheered the runners on as they passed by. I always cheer on the team that is losing.
See also: cheer, on

cheer up

v.
1. To become happier or more cheerful: I cheered up once the weather got warmer.
2. To make someone happier or more cheerful: The fine spring day cheered me up. The hospital staged a musical to cheer up the sick patients.
See also: cheer, up

Bronx cheer

(ˈbrɑŋks ˈtʃir)
n. a rude noise made with the lips; a raspberry. The little air compressor in the corner of the parking lot made a noise like a Bronx cheer.
See also: Bronx, cheer

Bronx cheer

A raucous expression of displeasure. The sarcastic reference is to how spectators at sporting events in New York City's borough of the Bronx—at Yankee Stadium, for a notable example—let players on visiting teams, and umpires too, know what was on their mind. The classic “Bronx cheer” sound was produced by compressing the lips and blowing, which replicated the sound of passing wind. That noise was earlier called a raspberry (or raspberry tart, the British rhyming slang for “fart”), from which the word “razz” came.
See also: Bronx, cheer
References in periodicals archive ?
4 : to shout with joy, approval, or enthusiasm <We cheered when he crossed the finish line.
I am cheered by the explosion of vital, vibrant new voices writing for the theatre.
I am cheered by the vibrancy of young designers, who astound me with their creativity as well as with their unprecedented technological fluency.
About a third of the 900 students at the lower school site cheered on England as they packed their school hall, and cheers rang out across the Cloister Way site.
1 -- color) Biff Baker is cheered on by Del Sur School students as he departs on a bike ride to raise money for the school.
About 50 supporters cheered for Moorpark's team, including the city mayor, the school principal and the school district superintendent.
The teens cheered when Jacqueline walked through the door and took her seat on a small stage.
It seemed like there were 2,000 fans, and every time I touched the ball they cheered,'' Turkoglu said.
In both communities, children cheered as Santa rode by atop a firetruck, and moms, dads and grandparents fought back tears as their children marched by in school bands and drill teams.
Walkers were met at the finish line by a person dressed as Woody from ``Toy Story'' and cheered by a Chatsworth competition cheering squad of 16 girls from several Valley schools.
The crowd cheered when Discovery appeared as a white dot in the cloudless sky, cheered again upon hearing the shuttle's signature twin sonic booms and cheered a third time when the shuttle landing gear kicked up dust on Edwards' main runway.
They came, they cheered, they celebrated the triumph of the human spirit over hatred.
Couldn't she just hang out with these girls she had cheered with for the last two years - friends who had seen her sitting up in the stands and asked her to join them down on the sidelines?
On several occasions, they have participated in a soccer match and cheered at a basketball game on the same evening.
Greeted by screaming fans and cheered from the moment he entered the arena, De La Hoya put on a brief but spectacular show by knocking out Kamau in the second round to retain his WBC welterweight title.