check out

(redirected from check something)

check out

1. verb To confirm that one has vacated one's hotel room (and pay the bill). We have to check out in an hour, so you guys seriously need to start packing!
2. verb To investigate, inspect, or look at something of interest. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is commonly used between "check" and "out." We checked out that house on the corner, but the price was too high considering all the work it needs. Wow, check this out—someone in the next town over won the lottery last week! Check out George over there. That dude knows how to dress!
3. verb To be verified as true, accurate, or meeting a certain standard. Surprisingly, her story checks out—she really was at the library until midnight last night.
4. verb To become unfocused or distracted; to cease participating in a meaningful way. Well, he's still blabbing away, but I couldn't tell you what he's talking about now—I checked out a while ago. I know Jim is retiring at the end of June, but he's already checked out if you ask me.
5. verb To complete a purchase by providing payment at the final point of sale, as in a retail store. I'm checking out right now, so I'll be out to the car in a minute. I'm about to check out—is there anything else you needed from the store?
6. verb To tally one's purchases and take payment for them. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is commonly used between "check" and "out." The cashier is checking me out right now, so I'll be out to the car in a minute. Please check out these customers while I see if we have any more of those items in the back.
7. verb To complete the necessary steps so that one can borrow something from a system, such as a library. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is commonly used between "check" and "out." What books did you check out from the library this week? Can I check these books out, or are they reference only?
8. verb, slang To look with interest at someone who one finds attractive. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is commonly used between "check" and "out." That cute guy over there is totally checking you out!
9. verb, slang To die. Doctor, I'm not ready to check out yet, so I'm willing to try your most aggressive approach.
10. noun The time at which one must vacate one's hotel room. When used as a noun, the phrase is often written as one word. Checkout is at 11 AM, so you guys need to start packing now!
11. noun The area of a store at which purchases are made. When used as a noun, the phrase is often written as one word. I'm at the checkout right now, so I hope there isn't anything else you need from the store.
See also: check, out

check someone or something out (of something)

to do the paperwork necessary to remove someone or something from something or some place. I will have the manager check you out of the hotel and send you the bill. The librarian checked out the computer to me.
See also: check, out

check someone or something out

to evaluate someone or something. That stock sounds good. I'll check it out. I'll check out the competition.
See also: check, out

check something out

to examine or try something; to think about something. It's something we all have to be concerned with. Check it out. Check out the new comedy show on tonight.
See also: check, out

check out (of something)

 and check out (from something)
to do whatever is necessary to leave a place and then depart, (check out (of something) is more frequent.) I will check out of the hotel at about noon. I will check out from the office and come right to where you are.
See also: check, out

check out

[for someone or something] to prove to be correctly represented. Everything you told me checks out with what other witnesses said.
See also: check, out

check out

1. Record one's departure from a hotel by paying the bill, or from a conference or other function, as in As soon as my bags are packed I'll check out of the motel. [Early 1900s]
2. Leave hurriedly, make a quick exit, as in The minute I get paid I'm checking out. [Slang; 1920s]
3. Die, as in When he got cholera, he was sure he'd check out. [Slang; 1920s]
4. Withdraw an item after recording the withdrawal, as in I'll check out the tapes on your library card. [1930s]
5. Record, total the prices, and receive payment for a purchase, as in The cashier checked out and bagged my groceries in record time.
6. check something or someone out . Investigate or evaluate something or someone; observe carefully. For example, I don't know if you'll like the film; check it out yourself, or That man who's staring is probably just checking us out. [Slang; mid-1900s]
7. Pass close inspection, as in That rattle made me suspicious, but the repairman said the machine checked out completely.
See also: check, out

check out

v.
1. To inspect something so as to determine accuracy, quality, or other condition; test something: The technician checked out the computer system to make sure there were no errors in the software. I heard a strange noise, so I went downstairs to check it out.
2. To be verified or confirmed; pass inspection: Although we doubted it at first, the suspect's story checked out.
3. To look at someone or something that is surprising, interesting, or attractive: If you liked that movie, you should check out the director's other films. Check out the size of that diamond! I became jealous when I saw my spouse checking the lifeguard out.
4. To settle one's bill and leave a hotel or other place of lodging: The hotel requires that guests check out by noon so that the rooms can be cleaned before the next guests arrive.
5. To record and sum the prices of and receive payment for something being purchased or the items someone is purchasing at a retail store: The cashier checked out and bagged my order. We brought our items to the counter, and the sales clerk checked us out.
6. To undergo the process of purchasing some selected item or items from a retailer: It took us an hour to check out because there was only one register.
7. To borrow some item, as from a library, with the lender registering or keeping track of the borrowing: I checked out all four volumes, but could only read the first before they were due. If you don't finish that book before the library closes, you will have to check it out. I went to the video store and checked out two movies.
8. To lose awareness of one's surroundings; become inattentive: I got bored at the meeting and checked out until someone punched me on the arm.
9. Slang To die: When I check out, I want to be buried in a fancy coffin.
See also: check, out

check something out

tv. to examine something; to think about something. It’s something we all have to be concerned with. Check it out.
See also: check, out, something

check out, to

To die. This slangy phrase transfers other kinds of departure to leaving this life, as in “He’s had several heart attacks and could check out any day.” It dates from the 1920s. To check something/someone out, on the other hand, meaning to investigate something or someone, as in “Let’s check out this new restaurant,” dates from the 1940s.
See also: check
References in periodicals archive ?
He further said that the medical colleges are producing mediocre lot and the doctors nowadays have no idea how to check something as petty as blood pressure.
Bogus workmen may say that they need to come in to check something or make urgent repairs.
We understand that you may just want to check something that has been playing on your mind, or run a business issue past us for a second independent opinion, and that is fine by us.
Use an alarm clock, a watch with an alarm, or a kitchen timer to remind you when you need to lahcda leave the house for an appointment, or when you have to check something cooking in the oven.
Some could come in useful when you want to check something out in the future.
The database is real time and is available 24/7 so that way countries know that the information they have is shared by other countries and if they want to check something, they can do it in that database," he said.
But his Met experience gave him an opportunity to check something off his bucket list.
Hill said inspectors had wanted to check something out, and when floodwaters receded, they were able to get a better look at a problem area.
Initially the thought was he'd probably moved to check something or to use the rest room.
We all have empty minutes; determine when yours occur and use them to check something off your to-do list.
So, she hurried through her charting--and when she came to the woman with eclampsia, she didn't bother to get the paper readout from the monitor (who would check something like that anyway?
Seven percent said solo trips provided them an opportunity to check something off of their bucket list.
Just think--if interruptions were on your list, you could check something off.
Before, it was totally impossible to do, but now they've got something that's very usable because the text is certainly accurate enough for the searching and all that, and when they have to look at a document to check something they're not sure about, the way their system works is they can bring their system up and look at the image.