cheat at (something)

(redirected from cheated at)

cheat at (something)

To act deceptively or unfairly while completing a task or participating in a competition. My little brother cheats at every board game, so it's not much fun to play with him.
See also: cheat

cheat at something

to use deception while competing [against someone]. They say she cheats at cards. The mob is likely to cheat at getting the contracts.
See also: cheat
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1964 Bill Bowers conducted the first studies on academic cheating, revealing that 75% of respondents had cheated at least once in their lives (as cited in Blachnio & Weremko, 2011).
Iranian-born Bahram Sahami, 37, cheated at American roulette by adding or removing chips from the table after the ball had dropped or by stealing other players' chips, Scotland Yard said.
A Rutgers University study followed 25,000 high school students from 2001 to 2008 and uncovered that more than 90 percent had cheated at some point.
Non-tenure track faculty members believe that only 20-30% of students have cheated at least once in college.
The confederates used their watches to ensure that they cheated at the same time during each episode.
Moffatt (1990) found 87 percent of economics majors self reported having cheated at least once, which was the largest percentage of four groups of majors at which he looked.
The Josephson Institute of Ethics found that the number of high school students who said they cheated at least once on a test jumped from 61 percent in 1992 to 74 percent in 2002.
Thirty-seven percent of those questioned reported that they had cheated at least once on an exam or written assignment, and 25% reported that they knew someone (another student) who routinely cheats on exams.