charge off

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charge off

1. To move hastily from a particular place or thing. We charged off when we heard the sirens approaching. After a few minutes of painting, the kids charged off to the next activity station at the birthday party.
2. To pay for something from a specific account or category of funds. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is often used between "charge" and "off." When you're traveling, just charge everything off your company account. A: "Will I get reimbursed if I charge this plane ticket off my personal bank account?" B: "You can just charge it off petty cash."
3. To attribute something to something else (which is stated after "to"). They're a very young team, so we'll charge off this loss to inexperience and nerves.
See also: charge, off

charge off

to move quickly or run away. He got angry and charged off. Juan charged off to talk to the boss.
See also: charge, off

charge off

1. Hurriedly depart, run away, as in After a few minutes, she charged off to the next exhibit. This term alludes to the military meaning of charge, "attack impetuously." [Early 1500s]
2. Also, charge against. Consider or count as an accounting loss or expense, as in I'm charging off this purchase to overhead, or Let's charge the new computer against office supplies. [Late 1800s] Also see write off.
3. Attribute to, blame something for, as in We can charge off these errors to inexperience.
See also: charge, off
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the banks in the New York District are charging off proportionally greater amounts in their C&I portfolio compared to the other districts.
TransUnion, one of the three national credit bureaus, reported that its analysis of consumer debt data collected by the Federal Reserve indicated that the drop in credit card balances nationally since 2009 had more to do with consumers paying down their card balances than from card issuers charging off delinquent accounts.
The conventional wisdom among many card analysts and some card issuers has been that balances dropped nationwide due to issuers charging off delinquent accounts and that consumers with active accounts had been actually continuing to add to their card balances.
As noted above, one potential option might involve charging off the worthless portion of a debt in the year it becomes worthless and waiting until a subsequent tax year to accept any property in exchange for the remainder of the outstanding debt.
His remarks came nine days after Financial Services Agency (FSA) Commissioner Shoji Mori called on banks to put priority on charging off bad loans and removing them from their balance sheets, instead of simply putting up more loan-loss provisions.
The FSA plans to craft by March 31 measures to have banks step up their disposal efforts with greater emphasis on charging off bad loans.