channel (something) in(to) (something)

(redirected from channels into)

channel (something) in(to) (something)

1. To force something, usually a liquid, to travel into something through a channel. We had to channel water in from the river after our pipes burst.
2. To allocate or give resources, such as money or time, to a particular venture or goal. How much money do you think the company would be willing to channel into this initiative?
3. To direct or release something, often energy or an emotion, into something else. With all the red paint, I'm not surprised to hear that the artist channeled a lot of anger into this piece. You need to channel your frustration into something positive. Come on a run with me.
See also: channel
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

channel something in

 (to something)
1. Lit. to divert water or other liquid through a channel into something. The farmer channeled the irrigation water into the field.
2. Fig. to divert something, such as energy, money, effort, into something. The government channeled a great deal of money into rebuilding the inner part of the city. I can't channel any more of our workforce into this project.
See also: channel
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Multichoice have rearranged the channels into genres which has resulted in a change of some of the channel positions and hence channel numbers changing.
The integration between the Cisco ICM and Cisco Collaboration Server components of the platform consolidates a contact center's Web and telephony customer interaction channels into an integrated customer contact environment.
Scientists are learning how to build ion channels into silicon-based biosensors that they hope will announce the presence of minuscule amounts of neuro-transmitters, drugs and workplace or battlefield poisons.
And a few manufacturers are already putting custom-built communications channels into their computers to handle high data rates.
They found that the inhibitors move the channels into neutral and stimulators move the channels into a previously unknown mode in which they are almost always open.