change (one's) ways

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change (one's) ways

To start behaving in a different, usually preferable, way. After I got in yet another fight at school, the headmaster told me that I had to change my ways or else I'd be expelled. No matter how old you are, there is still time to change your ways.
See also: change, way

change your ˈways

start to live or behave in a different way from before: I’ve learned my lesson and I’m going to try to change my ways.It’s unlikely your boss will change his ways.
See also: change, way
References in periodicals archive ?
Once you digest the implications of what free power means, you'll realise the world is set to change ways, even more fundamentally than how communications changed it.
Last but not the least, the Government is now working full time to revamp the anganwadi system to change ways in which nutrition is being administered to children and pregnant women in them, the WCD Minister said.
The post Discussions to change ways of mediating loan restructuring appeared first on Cyprus Mail.
They influenced people in such a way that people started believing that they will really change ways, thoughts and means of the system, but they are exposed now.
Therefore, it is now up to the US president to change ways, alter methods, and provide for new appropriate atmospheres for holding dialogues," he said.
There is no way forward for the council under the current system, and we have got to change ways of doing things.
CBT is designed to help people change ways of thinking and behavior that have problematic outcomes," Dr.
But let us all realize that to change ways of thinking by students, we must first change the ways of thinking by teachers.
The new technology allows accurate, automatic translation of emails, documents and web pages instantly, without the need to cut and paste or to change ways of working.
Flexible to the service, able to be multi-skilled, work holistically, patient-centred, a team worker recognising your own limitations but not being afraid to push out boundaries and seek and change ways of working to benefit the patient.
To change ways of thinking, Vanclay and Lawrence argue:
They helped change ways of life that had perhaps become some-what decadent, and encouraged the flow of new ideas from one settled place to another.
The SDC is actively involved in efforts to change ways of thinking in that regard, and supports a wide range of structures that help the victims.