change (one's) mind

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change (one's) mind

1. To change one's original opinion, choice, or plan. Politicians get criticized for flip-flopping, but I think we should value the ability to change one's mind on an issue. I guess he changed his mind and decided to go to the beach instead.
2. To persuade or cause one to change one's original opinion, choice, or plan. I never liked mushrooms before, but you really changed my mind with this dish. He's set on buying that car. Don't bother trying to change his mind.
See also: change, mind

change someone's mind

to cause a person to think differently (about someone or something). Tom thought Mary was unkind, but an evening out with her changed his mind. I can change my mind if you convince me that you are right.
See also: change, mind

(I) changed my mind.

I have reversed my previous decision or statement. Tom: I thought you were going to Atlanta today. Bill: I changed my mind. I'm leaving tomorrow. Mary: I thought that this room was going to be done in red. Sue: I changed my mind.
See also: change, mind

change one's mind

Alter one's views or intentions, as in I can always change my mind about going on this trip. [Early 1600s]
See also: change, mind

change your ˈmind

change your decision or opinion: He was intending to go to the party but now he’s changed his mind and decided to stay in.
See also: change, mind

change (one's) mind

To reverse a previously held opinion or an earlier decision.
See also: change, mind
References in periodicals archive ?
Democracy allows us to change our government every five years but this referendum does not allow us to change our minds ever.
How to Change Your Mind chronicles the unusual power of these substances, instilling a better understanding of their capabilities in helping to discover, heal and change our minds. It's a trip worth taking.
For our psychological balance, we are meant to change our minds. It's absurd to think that we will believe the same things at 80 that we did at 18, that our worldview can really survive intact when constantly pulverised by the relentless tides of experience.
Are we, the enduring presence of Jesus in the world, willing to change our minds when the "signs of the times" engage us in conversation about the role of women in ministry, the exclusion of our brothers and sisters from the Communion table, the reinstatement of married celebrants of the Eucharist?