censure

(redirected from censuring)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

censure (one)

To criticize or scold someone, often in an official manner. The judge censured the lawyer for his outburst during the hearing.
See also: censure

censure (one) for (something)

To criticize or scold someone, often in an official manner. The judge censured the lawyer for his outburst during the hearing.
See also: censure

censure someone (for something)

to criticize someone formally for having done something. Please don't censure us for doing our duty. The legislature proposed to censure one of its members.
References in periodicals archive ?
Censuring the prime minister is ''a new power'' the DPJ-led opposition parties acquired after securing a majority in the upper chamber.
More recently, just months after the conclusion of the Clinton impeachment proceedings, Republican members of Congress -- having just opposed censure on constitutional grounds -- advocated a series of resolutions "[d]eploring the actions of President Clinton regarding granting clemency to FALN [Armed Forces of National Liberation] terrorists."(81) Like Senator Southard in 1834,(82) these Republicans implicitly distinguished between disagreeing with the President's conduct and actually censuring him.
Senate Republican leader Trent Lott floated the idea of censuring President Clinton, if there was insufficient evidence to impeach him, in an interview in which he also called on Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr to wrap up his investigation quickly.
Now, however, he is (again rightly) unhappy with this simple answer, which makes the law speak with conflicting voices: on the one hand, it addresses actual and potential criminals in appropriate moral terms, seeking their obedience to its justified demands and censuring their wrong-doing; but it then also addresses them in the non-moral language of deterrence, coercing obedience by threats - a language which is surely not appropriate between state and responsible citizen.
EWEB commissioners moved into uncharted waters last month when they voted to consider censuring one of their own members.
Q: Why did you decide to testify at the March 31 Senate Judiciary hearing on censuring Bush?
Soon after Senator Russ Feingold, Democrat of Wisconsin, proposed censuring the President for his unauthorized wiretap ping program, Democrats began tripping all over themselves as they rushed to back away from the proposal.
Entitled "Time for Facts, Not Resolutions," it scolded Senator Russ Feingold for having the temerity to call for censuring Bush.