cease to be

cease to be

To die, expire, or no longer exist. (Used without a qualifying verb, noun, or adjective; otherwise, the cessation merely refers to said verb, noun, or adjective—e.g., "cease to be entertained.") After the recession, many of the small businesses populating the mall simply ceased to be. Without her love, I feel that I would cease to be!
See also: cease
References in periodicals archive ?
Ms Griffiths said: I never cease to be amazed at how knowledgeable our children are when it comes to environmental matters.
I never cease to be shocked at the terrible things that are happening to our once lovely country.
To a world in which peace seems to be slipping, to a nation in which unemployment is on the rise, to congregations who know in their hearts that, if they keep on being who they are, they will someday cease to be, to pastors who are just plain tired, to people sick and shunned, oppressed and afraid, Christ comes!
But are we to assume that one may fittingly cease to be Blondie by becoming Dagwood?
It is then I cease to be a manager or spectator of life, and become a participant.
About the election posters, he added: "I cease to be an AM at midnight on May 2 and any posters in my premises will be taken down or suitably amended.