cave

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an Aladdin's cave

A place full of treasures. (In The Arabian Nights, Aladdin finds a magic lamp in a cave.) I know you think your garage is full of junk, but to an antiques collector like me, it's an Aladdin's cave!
See also: cave

cave in

1. verb To collapse into a hollow area below, as of a physical structure or formation. We were able to get the kids out of the house before the roof caved in.
2. verb To collapse, faint, or die, as from over-exertion. I hardly remember the end of the marathon because I caved in as soon as I crossed the finish line.
3. verb To submit, concede, or yield (to someone or something); to surrender or acknowledge defeat. Under the threat of a strike, the management caved in and agreed to reinstate annual pay increases for all employees.
4. noun A collapse into a hollow area below, as of a physical structure or formation. When used as a noun, the phrase is usually hyphenated. The fear of every miner is a cave-in.
See also: cave

keep cave

old-fashioned To remain vigilant or carefully watchful (for something or someone); to act as a guard or watch. In this phrase, "cave" derives from a Latin word meaning "beware." The gang employed youths from the area to keep cave and give a signal if any police officers arrived. I offered to keep cave at the door, as I had no intention of risking my life in that creepy old house.
See also: cave, keep

man cave

A room or area of a house designated for a man to retreat from the rest of his family and relax or engage in hobbies. My husband is watching the football game in his man cave right now.
See also: cave, man

the roof caves in

The situation collapses; everything goes wrong. I was living paycheck to paycheck and getting by OK, but then the roof caved in. I lost my job, and then my car and my house.
See also: cave, roof
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

cave in

[for a roof or ceiling] to collapse. The roof of the mine caved in when no one was there. The tunnel caved in on the train.
See also: cave

cave in (to someone or something)

Fig. to give in to someone or something. Finally, the manager caved in to the customer's demands. I refuse to cave in under pressure from my opponent.
See also: cave
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cave in

1. Fall in, collapse, as in The earthquake made the walls cave in. [Early 1700s]
2. Give in, admit defeat, as in The prosecutor's questions soon made the witness cave in. [Early 1800s]
3. Collapse, faint, or die from exhaustion, as in After a twenty-mile hike I caved in. [Mid-1800s]
See also: cave
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

an Aladdin's cave

a place full of valuable objects.
See also: cave

keep cave

act as lookout. school slang
Cave is a Latin word meaning ‘beware!’ Pronounced as one or two syllables, cave was the traditional warning uttered by a schoolchild to let others know that a teacher was approaching.
See also: cave, keep
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

an Aladdin’s ˈcave

a place full of valuable or interesting objects: He kept for his private pleasure an Aladdin’s cave of stolen masterpieces.This expression comes from a story in The Arabian Nights. Aladdin was trapped in a cave full of gold and jewels by a magician.
See also: cave
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

cave in

v.
To give way; collapse: The sides of the snow fort caved in. The mine shaft caved in on a group of miners, but fortunately they were rescued.
See also: cave
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Spokesman Graham Robertson, 48 - a plumber from Skelmanthorpe - said: "Caving can be unpredictable and there is always the possibility of flooding.
When Huddersfield Caving Group was set up in the mid 1990s, the advertisement read: "Very small group of friends ready to welcome people for walking, camping, cycling, caving."
Today, the club aspect has almost disappeared, but an informal group of caving enthusiasts still meets up occasionally.
The Huddersfield Caving Group existed officially between 1995 and 2006.
Most members of the old Huddersfield Caving Group came from the Denby Dale, Shelley and Skelmanthorpe area.
For Graham - a man with 30 years' caving experience - the Huddersfield Caving Group brings back many pleasant memories.
"Often we'd go camping and engage in lots of different outdoor activities, not just caving."
The NSG was founded in 1955 and acted as an umbrella body for caving enthusiasts throughout the north of England.
Alongside the Huddersfield Caving Group there has been the Huddersfield Technical College Potholing Club and the University of Huddersfield Union Caving Club.
There is little scope for caving in the Huddersfield and Kirklees area, so club members used to make regular visits to the Peak District and the Yorkshire Dales.
They wore a real caving helmet and explored how it felt to move through restricted and fragile spaces of caves, but above ground and in daylight.