cavil

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Related to cavils: deteriorate, averred, convened, impugned

cavil at (one)

To complain to one about someone or something, especially in a way that one finds annoying. If you hate your job so much, quit caviling at me about it and look for a new one!
See also: cavil

cavil at someone

to find fault with someone; to complain about someone constantly. Will you never cease caviling at all of us? There is no need to cavil at me day and night!
See also: cavil
References in periodicals archive ?
These cavils peaked when he called for al-Megrahi's repatriation.
Cavils aside, this is an interesting and rewarding book that can be enjoyed when read straight through or in snippets.
Though Schwarzkopf' s voice lacks the richness and steadiness of her glory years (the 1950s and 1960s), her uncommonly knowing accounts of this repertory erase all cavils.
Yet these cavils aside, the strengths of Literature and Utopian Politics in Seventeenth-Century England far outweigh their weaknesses.
Those cavils, as always with Lucie ("Progress," "Hard Feelings"), must be set against his characteristic cut-and-thrust, a killer approach that has been firing up leftist British drama for two decades.
Of course, these cavils flit futilely against my overall reaction to Wampler's work: Quite simply, I like it.
These cavils notwithstanding, Free People of Color is a good and necessary book one that should spur further work--based on the social and community history models and approaches which Horton and others have marshalled to such great effect.
But these are minor cavils and this volume should be welcomed by all readers with an interest in the seventeenth century.
When Bruce Wayne (Michael Keaton) has to rush off to save Gotham City from poison-gas extermination, Vicky Vale (Kim Basinger) cavils, "It doesn't have to be a perfect world.
But such cavils soon vanished in the light of such colourful playing from these excellent instrumentalists: a sultry low flute in the first movement's sunny second subject, glowing horns and pastoral woodwind in a gripping slow movement, grinding brass in the finale's tortuous harmonies.
Nevertheless, the above comments must be interpreted as cavils in what is otherwise an excellent and exhaustive piece of scholarship.
All of my complaints and (admittedly) cavils are prompted, in the end, by Johnston's failure to raise one authorial finger toward accomplishing any critical biography's minimum purpose: to explain why the work of the artist in question is interesting enough to merit all this explaining.